A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Rally Software Development

22 found.

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1.
#28605

The Agile/Waterfall Cooperative   (members only)

In this tutorial, attendees will learn to factor their company's business needs into their existing Agile procedures, and management will learn how to begin the investigative work of determining how to streamline these requirements and activities so that they don't hamper the project.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

2.
#27563

CIO's Playbook for Adopting the Scrum Method of Achieving Software Agility   (members only)

The authors of this whitepaper have helped many hundreds of teams adopt Scrum. Here they share how CIOs can implement Scrum on an organization-wide basis - the challenges they will face as well as the rewards - and provides a playbook for adopting Scrum in enterprises where software, and lots of it, is the key to competitive success in the marketplace.

Leffingwell, Dean and Hubert Smits. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Management>Agile>Scrum

3.
#28599

A CIO's Playbook for Adopting the Scrum Method of Achieving Software Agility   (members only)

Scrum is a proven, Agile software management method that has been widely adopted by organizations seeking to reliably deliver higher quality software. Scrum is a simple process: it has a small set of interrelated practices and rules, is not overly prescriptive, can be learned quickly and produces productivity gains almost immediately.

Schwaber, Ken, Dean Leffingwell and Hubert Smits. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile>Scrum

4.
#28612

A CIO's Playbook for Adopting the Scrum Method of Achieving Software Agility   (PDF)   (members only)

Provides a brief overview of the Scrum method as well as 'playbook' of guidelines and tactics for enterprise-wide adoption of Scrum.

Schwaber, Ken, Dean Leffingwell and Hubert Smits. Rally Software Development (2006). Articles>Project Management>Agile>Scrum

5.
#27569

The Daily Stand-Up

The first and most basic rhythm of the Agile feedback cycle is the daily standup. It's just what it sounds like - a daily meeting where everyone stands up for the duration of the meeting. When I give Agile workshops, one of the questions I'm often asked is how to do daily standups when the teams are geographically dispersed. While this can be a challenge to coordinate and maintain, you'll soon find that the benefits of the daily communication make it well worth the effort. Here are several options to consider with your team:

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Project Management>Agile>Collaboration

6.
#28607

DSDM: Go for the Nine   (members only)

This presentation reviews the benefits, principles and history of DSDM (Dynamic Systems Development Method).

Tabaka, Jean. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

7.
#28597

Five Levels of Agile Planning: From Enterprise Product Vision to Team Stand-up   (members only)

Existing agile methods often focus on small, single-team projects and overlook the broader impact of large, multi-team and multi-year projects. This paper outlines a distinct planning framework that has been used successfully in large-scale agile software development projects and relies on five levels: product vision, product roadmap, release plan, sprint plan and daily commitment. Each of the five levels of planning addresses the fundamental planning principles: priorities, estimates and commitments. In this paper, the main agile principles are introduced, as well as the Lean principles upon which the agile methods are built. One of those Lean principles, Muri, or overburdening of people, is addressed through the extension of the agile planning process. The extension of the most used agile planning technique (iteration planning) is described in detail, both the motivation for the extension as well as the collaboration practices behind each planning level. In the final chapter, the impact of product complexities on the planning process is evaluated, and a solution to create a smooth flow in the planning/delivery cycle is presented.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile

8.
#28604

Five Levels of Planning   (members only)

The purpose of this presentation is to learn how to plan Agile projects from product vision all the way to daily stand-up and to feel the effect when 100 people prioritize, estimate and commit the plans for a major delivery.

Tabaka, Jean and Hubert Smits. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

9.
#28606

Homer's Odyssey   (members only)

In this offbeat presentation, Jean compares the impediments and obstacles encountered by an Agile mentor with those detailed in Homer's classical reference. Through the presentation and dialogue, you will discover who plays which classical roles in an organization's effort to adopt Agile practices: Cyclops, the Sirens, Poseidon, Circe, Cicones, the Lotus-Eaters, and even the good-and-faithful dog Argus.

Tabaka, Jean. Rally Software Development (2006). Articles>Project Management>Agile

10.
#27564

How to Manage Agile Development   (members only)

This whitepaper provides an Agile development overview full of techniques, best practices and educational materials.

Leffingwell, Dean. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Management>Agile

11.
#27568

Introduction to Agile Methods and Practices   (members only)

Provides a broad introduction to concepts of agile software development and agile methods. The talk is based on his experience as an agile coach and Certified Scrum Master.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Management>Agile>Methods

12.
#28611

Introduction to Agile Methods and Practices   (members only)

Rally's Hubert Smits provides a broad introduction to concepts of Agile software development and Agile methods. The talk is based on his experience as an Agile coach and Certified Scrum Master. Concepts that are known from waterfall or plan-driven development are transformed to an Agile perspective. Examples are release and iteration planning, progress reporting, meeting formats and scaling projects from 10 people teams to 300 people teams.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile>Scrum

13.
#27567

Introduction to Scrum Practices   (members only)

This tutorial brings Scrum to life by introducing Scrum principles, process, practices and roles in the form of an actual Sprint timebox. The prioritized, timeboxed topics are presented and delivered as arranged by the tutorial attendees.

Tabaka, Jean. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Management>Agile>Scrum

14.
#28602

Overview of Agile   (members only)

This presentation provides a broad introduction to concepts of Agile software development and Agile methods. The talk is based on the speaker's experience as an Agile coach and Certified Scrum Master. Traditional concepts from waterfall or plan-driven development are transformed to an Agile perspective. Examples are release and iteration planning, progress reporting, meeting formats and scaling projects from 10 people teams to 300 people teams.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

15.
#27562

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

This paper focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Project Management>Agile>Collaboration

16.
#28598

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

When software development project teams move to Agile methodologies, they often leave project managers behind. Traditionally trained project managers are confused as to what their new roles and responsibilities should be in an environment that no longer needs them to make stand-alone decisions. This paper focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core Agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to Agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an Agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile

17.
#28609

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

When software development project teams move to Agile methodologies, they often leave project managers behind. Traditionally trained project managers are confused as to what their new roles and responsibilities should be in an environment that no longer needs them to make stand-alone decisions. This presentation focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core Agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to Agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an Agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

18.
#27565

Stop Super-sizing Your Release Plans   (members only)

In this presentation Ryan Martens and Luke Hohmann describe and show product owners how to think in terms of small, evenly spaced meals. They will introduce Agile principles, processes, tools and organizational structures that enable product owners to support their Agile development team's need for continuous, just-in-time elaboration of requirements and acceptance tests.

Martens, Ryan. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

19.
#28608

Stop Super-Sizing Your Release Plans   (members only)

As Agile development teams gain success, the team's bottleneck moves up the food chain to product owners. To support rapid and iterative progress, development teams are demanding that product owners switch from traditional approaches of super-sizing long release cycles to a continuous flow of independent, negotiable and small, bite-sized morsels.

Martens, Ryan. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

20.
#28601

Successfully Managing Agile Projects in the Waterfall Enterprise   (members only)

Agile and waterfall methods are utterly different—from the way projects start to the expected deliverables and release schedules. In a waterfall world, what's an IT enterprise to do? Can agile and waterfall methodologies successfully coexist? The answer is yes, for both the short-term and the long-term. In this presentation, Michele Sliger outlines how to: factor your company's business needs into existing agile processes, streamline requirements and activities and identify specific points where agile and waterfall teams must plan, coordinate, and review progress. Learn how you can make agile processes work in the real-world.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile

21.
#28600

Tactical Management of Agile Development: Achieving Competitive Advantage   (members only)

This whitepaper provides an Agile development overview full of techniques, best practices and educational materials.

Leffingwell, Dean. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile

22.
#28603

A Tale of Two Technical Writing Teams   (members only)

Sometimes considered an afterthought in the product development lifecycle, technical writers often struggle to become part of a performing Agile team.

Broderick, Stacia. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile>Technical Writing

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