A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

List Apart, A

482 found. Page 1 of 20.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20  NEXT PAGE »

 

1.
#39097

80/20 Practitioners Make Better Communicators

Approaches that are either too general or too specific can easily overwhelm practitioners—and derail budgets. Fresh from recent experiences with two large-scale redesigns, Katie Kovalcin suggests that flexibility and open communication can transform all team members into what she calls “80/20 practitioners,” creating a more effective balance of time and resources.

Kovalcin, Katie. List Apart, A (2015). Articles>Project Management>Web Design>Collaboration

2.
#36610

Accent Folding for Auto-Complete

A common assumption about internationalization is that every user fits into a single locale like “English, United States” or “French, France.” It’s a hangover from the PC days when just getting the computer to display the right squiggly bits was a big deal. One byte equaled one character, no exceptions, and you could only load one language’s alphabet at a time. This was fine because it was better than nothing, and because users spent most of their time with documents they or their coworkers produced themselves. Today users deal with data from everywhere, in multiple languages and locales, all the time. The locale I prefer is only loosely correlated with the locales I expect applications to process.

Bueno, Carlos. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Localization>Unicode

3.
#26675

The Accessibility Hat Trick: Getting Abbreviations Right

AAA-level compliance is the ideal of accessibility, the bonus-round of accessible design: AAA-level compliant pages meet the needs of every group of users. AAA is achievable, but requires preparation and forethought.

Lieberman, Colin. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

4.
#37807

The Accessibility of WAI-ARIA

Web developers interested in accessibility issues often look to WAI-ARIA to bridge the accessibility gap created by ubiquitous scripting and make web applications more accessible to blind and visually impaired users. But can we recommend WAI-ARIA without reservation? Are there times when appropriate semantic HTML elements are preferable to custom widgets?

Fischer, Detlev. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Standards

5.
#13545

Accessibility, Web Standards, and Authoring Tools

It's been a long trip, but we’re almost out of the dark. We finally have browsers that offer substantial support for several technologies established by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and other standards bodies. Designers and developers can use many core features of XHTML and CSS and sometimes DHTML without worrying about the hazards of cross–browser chicanery. As browsers have evolved, it’s become easier to comply with the W3C’s Web Accessibility initiative (WAI) and, in the United States, with the amendments to Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974 (commonly called “Section 508”).

Schmitt, Christopher. List Apart, A (2002). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Standards

6.
#38916

Accessibility: The Missing Ingredient

Why is accessibility often treated as an afterthought? Key factors include lack of tools and specifications, weak industry demand, and developer laziness.

Hoffman, Andrew. List Apart, A (2014). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility

7.
#20243

Accessibility: The Politics of Design

Herrell deconstructs the new U.S. accessibility regulations and their implications for web designers everywhere. Part of our ongoing series on accessibility in web design.

Herrell, Alan. List Apart, A (2001). Design>Accessibility>Web Design>Regulation

8.
#31101

Accessible Data Visualization with Web Standards

When designing interfaces for browsing data-driven sites, creating navigation elements that are also visualization tools helps the user make better decisions. Wilson Miner demonstrates three techniques for incorporating data visualization into standards-based navigation patterns.

Minor, Wilson. List Apart, A (2008). Design>Web Design>Graphic Design>Charts and Graphs

9.
#25503

Accessible Pop-up Links

Sometimes we have to use pop-ups — so we might as well do them right. This article will show you how to make them more accessible and reliable while simplifying their implementation.

Chassot, Caio. List Apart, A (2004). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>CSS

10.
#28701

Accessible Web 2.0 Applications with WAI-ARIA

Our web applications can suffer from inaccessibility problems due to inherent markup limitations. Martin Kliehm helps us sort through the WAI specs for Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) to increase usability.

Kliehm, Martin. List Apart, A (2007). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Ajax

11.
#19633

Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

Robertson, Stuart. List Apart, A (2003). Design>Web Design>Information Design

12.
#33945

Advanced Debugging with JavaScript

When used effectively, JavaScript debuggers help find and squash errors in your JavaScript code. To become an advanced JavaScript debugger, you’ll need to know about the debuggers available to you, the typical JavaScript debugging workflow, and code requirements for effective debugging. In this article, we’ll discuss advanced debugging techniques for diagnosing and treating bugs using a sample web application.

Mills, Chris and Hallvord R. M. Steen. List Apart, A (2009). Articles>Web Design>Programming>JavaScript

13.
#28238

The ALA Primer Part Two: Resources For Beginners

ALA Production Manager Erin Lynch and the ALA staff offer a few starting points for the next generation of people who make websites.

Lynch, Erin and ALA Staff. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design

14.
#28242

ALA Primer: A Guide for New Readers

ALA production manager Erin Lynch sifts through our archives and offers up a list of starting points for new readers.

Lynch, Erin. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design

15.
#13369

Alternative Style: Working With Alternate Style Sheets

So you have an XML document. You’ve also been a good little web developer and used style sheets to control what your document looks like. You’ve even gone the extra mile and created several alternative style sheets to show how hardcore you are. Great. But now you need a cross–browser way to dynamically switch between the style sheets.

Sowden, Paul. List Apart, A (2002). Design>Web Design>HTML

16.
#26362

Ambient Findability: Findability Hacks

Findability is one of the most thorny problems in web design. This is due in part to the inherent ambiguity of semantics and structure. We label and categorize things in so many ways that retrieval is difficult at best. But that’s only the half of it. The most formidable challenges stem from its cross-functional, interdisciplinary nature. Findability defies classification. It flows across the borders between design, engineering, and marketing. Everybody is responsible, and so we run the risk that nobody is accountable.

Morville, Peter. List Apart, A (2005). Design>Web Design>User Centered Design>Search

17.
#28353

Anonymity and Online Community: Identity Matters

While anonymity may allow people to feel more free and disinhibited to discuss otherwise embarrassing or stigmatizing topics, it can also be a community's biggest enemy.

Grohol, John M. List Apart, A (2006). Articles>Web Design>Community Building

18.
#37555

Apps vs. the Web

Pull the iPhone out of your pocket and look at the home screen. Likely, you’re seeing some well known brands on the web: Facebook, Flickr, and Google to name just a few. You’ll also see companies like Amazon, Target, and Walmart which sell a lot of products via the web. Like you, these sites and companies know how to build an effective website using the latest and greatest web technologies. The iPhone’s Safari browser also supports HTML5 markup with CSS3 styling and is powered by a fast JavaScript engine. So why is there a proliferation of apps instead of web pages that can do the same thing?

Hockenberry, Craig. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Mobile>User Interface

19.
#37806

ARIA and Progressive Enhancement

Now that the release of ARIA is approaching, let’s take a look at how ARIA fits within progressive enhancement strategy. Can we use ARIA in a way that respects progressive enhancement? Can we use ARIA in ways that ensure we have a working solution at every level?

Featherstone, Derek. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Standards

20.
#22797

Art Direction and the Web

Introduces the principles and techniques of the art director, and shows how art directional concepts can shape memorable user experiences.

Hay, Stephen. List Apart, A (2004). Design>Web Design>Graphic Design

21.
#20244

The Art of Topless Dancing and Information Design

Creating a web site makes for all sorts of strange working relationships. What does an information designer have to do to get a little cooperation?

Warren, Denice. List Apart, A (2001). Design>Information Design>Web Design

22.
#38531

Artistic Distance

If you are passionate about what you create, it is impossible to completely disassociate yourself from your work in order to objectively evaluate and then improve it. But the ability to achieve “artistic distance”—that is, to attain a place that allows you to contemplate your design on its own merits—will enable you to improve your own work immeasurably and, ultimately, to cast off the immature shackles of ego. Learn to let your work shine by letting go of it. Acquire the knack of achieving artistic distance.

Burton, Paul. List Apart, A (2012). Articles>Web Design>Graphic Design

23.
#26440

Attack of the Zombie Copy

You can keep copy from turning zombie by starting with a clear idea of exactly what you want to say. It's tempting to just start writing, but this approach can leave your pages vulnerable to zombification, because it's easier to sound like you’re making sense than to actually make sense. Outlines can serve as an effective vaccine against living death.

Kissane, Erin. List Apart, A (2005). Articles>Web Design>Writing

24.
#27932

Automatic Magazine Layout

You can't always count on having a professional designer around to resize and position your images for you, but you'd rather your page layout didn't look like it was created by orangutans. Harvey Kane builds a script that makes your life easier.

Kane, Harvey. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design>Document Design>CSS

25.
#28322

Avoid Edge Cases by Designing Up Front

Better planning and a beefed-up style guide may be exactly what you need to avoid markup derangement or, worse, a dysfunctional product.

Henick, Ben. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design>Project Management>CSS

 
 NEXT PAGE »

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon