A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Wikis

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A wiki is a page or collection of Web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content, using a simplified markup language. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites, usually as a very simple form of content management.

 

76.
#34751

Using Wikis to Document UI Specifications

As Agile gains momentum as a development approach of choice, documenting design becomes a challenge. Peter Gremett shows how using a wiki to capture your design is a great way to be adaptive as you build and deliver product to customers.

Gremett, Peter. Boxes and Arrows (2009). Articles>User Interface>Agile>Wikis

77.
#38596

Using Wikis to Facilitate Collaboration among Product Teams and its Implications for the Technical Writing Teams

A wiki represents a relatively new approach for the product teams to easily create and manage project data. Wikis are web pages that are easily editable and their ease of use ensures that that no one is excluded from making contributions to it. Any team member can edit or create wiki pages without requiring HTML knowledge by providing his/her login information.

Agile Docs (2012). Design>Writing>Wikis>Agile

78.
#33645

Web 2.0, Wikis, and Books   (PDF)   (members only)

The founder of FLOSS manuals discusses the intersection of books and Web 2.0 and the continuing evolution of publishing and technology.

Hyde, Adam. Intercom (2009). Articles>Documentation>Content Management>Wikis

79.
#35287

WebWorks ePublisher for Converting Documents to Confluence Wiki

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve had the chance to experiment with WebWorks ePublisher, a set of tools that converts documents from Word, FrameMaker and DITA XML to a number of different output formats. One of those output formats is Confluence wiki. It’s been very interesting, so I thought I’d blog about it and see if anyone else wants to give it a go as well.

Maddox, Sarah. ffeathers (2009). Articles>Web Design>Content Management>Wikis

80.
#29544

What is Wiki?

Wiki is a category of web server software that allows users to contribute content. Collaboration is the key to Wiki, which is designed as a powerful system for online communities to build web pages and web sites. Unlike blogs and forums, all users are allowed to contribute and edit existing content. Wiki is derived from the Hawaiian term "wiki wiki" meaning "quick". The concept behind a Wiki is that collaboration on projects will move it along quicker.

Small Business Software (2007). Articles>Content Management>Web Design>Wikis

81.
#31117

Whikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Quickness

The fact that a Workplace could be considered 'quick' is not properly linked with the easiness to find information or with the speedy level of the communications: in this context it is linked to the Wiki feature of assuring a real-time updating access to contents and resources (data, information or knowledge and physical resources).

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2007). Articles>Content Management>Collaboration>Wikis

82.
#34583

Why Businesses (Don't) Collaborate: Meeting Management, Group Input and Wiki Use

Today, content professionals are tugged in multiple directions, expected to multi-task their way through an increasing amount of work with the help of software tools designed to make them more productive. This survey aims to explore how you and your co-workers utilize software tools and determine, in various scenarios, whether they are actually a help or a hindrance.

Mader, Stewart and Scott Abel. Scribd (2009). Articles>Project Management>Collaboration>Wikis

83.
#38353

Why I Returned to Wikis for Help Authoring

Good documentation about new sites, tools, and resources can be used for marketing efforts. Marketing and documentation don’t need to be separate efforts. I could leverage volunteer enthusiasm for documentation and then pull highlights from the documentation to post as news for the blog. Wikis have so many advantages that it’s hard for me to understand the case for traditional help authoring systems when you need a collaborative authoring environment.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2011). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Wikis

84.
#33884

Why Use A Wiki?

The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of the Web-based collaborative authoring environment commonly referred to as wikis, and examine how they can be used in a corporate publishing environment. The paper also includes suggested techniques for transferring existing content from native authoring tools into a wiki format for online delivery.

Porter, Alan J. Shortcovers (2009). Articles>Content Management>Wikis>White Papers

85.
#33635

Why Wikis Won't Kill Technical Writing

Many people have predicted that wikis will replace traditional help in the future. Ok, I can buy that. But I've also heard that technical writers will surrender content control to SMEs and users, and will move into other roles such as merely editing wiki content, or switching to programming, training. Sorry. I just can't see that happening. In the world of wikis, technical writers will still be kings of content.

HelpScribe (2008). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Wikis

86.
#34660

Wiki Analytics

Are there algorithmic ways of determining the health of a Wiki? There are likely a number of different patterns of healthy Wikis and, more importantly, healthy Wiki-based communities. If we can identify and visualize these patterns, we can apply these analytics to: understand the patterns of interactions in a healthy community; aid the community to use the Wiki more effectively; and encourage developers to facilitate these patterns in the tool itself.

Socialtext (2009). Articles>Web Design>Wikis>Log Analysis

87.
#35403

Wiki as Forum, FAQ, HTML Editor, XML Editor, or CMS?

A wiki can be a Frequently Asked Questions repository, much like the knowledge bases in their heyday in the late 80s. My favorite line from the blog entry has to be its closer: 'It's about a different way of thinking around how to interact with the community.' And that is what I have explored with my wiki presentation, about how to build community with a wiki and be an active member of that community. But what are other uses of the wiki?

Gentle, Anne. Just Write Click (2007). Articles>Documentation>Content Management>Wikis

88.
#38352

Wiki Culture, Reader/Writer Distinctions, and Divergence from Structured Authoring

When we talk about wikis, it’s important to see them as more than just another authoring platform. As a reader, knowing that I can change the text alters my sense of the text. It is no longer the absolute word on the matter. I can be a part of the conversation; I can change the message. It is my content as much as another’s.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2011). Articles>Writing>Content Management>Wikis

89.
#36147

A Wiki Isn't A Character From Star Wars

It may sound like Chewbacca's cousin, but a wiki is actually an open source website that allows creation and editing of content by anyone with an Internet connection. The word "wiki" is Hawaiian for 'fast' or 'quick' and probably the most famous example is Wikipedia, the free Encyclopaedia written by people around the world. A wiki can be public or private one, for instance they can be used on intranets and extranets as a great replacement for messy email trails between multiple correspondents.

Parker, Adam. Fresh Business Thinking (2010). Articles>Content Management>Wikis

90.
#34384

Wiki Myths, Wiki Reality

Although wikis have gained substantially in popularity since they first appeared some ten years ago, many enterprises still begin their wiki projects with unrealistic expectations.

Jespersen, Dorthe R. CMSwatch (2009). Articles>Content Management>Wikis>Content Strategy

91.
#37115

Wiki Myths, Wiki Reality

Although wikis have gained substantially in popularity since they first appeared some ten years ago, many enterprises still begin their wiki projects with unrealistic expectations. Wikis can indeed deliver powerful value, but you want to approach them with the same critical eye that you would any other information technology.

Jespersen, Dorthe R. CMSwatch (2009). Articles>Content Management>Wikis

92.
#31186

A Wiki Situation

Admit it: You sometimes consult Wikipedia. Scott McLemee wonders if you should write for it, too.

McLemee, Scott. Inside Higher Ed (2006). Articles>Publishing>Online>Wikis

93.
#29197

Wiki-fying Docs: Is Using Customer-Accessible Wikis for End-User Documentation Gaining Momentum?

While the effort to provide more interactivity and power to the end-user seems to suggest that we open up a wiki to allow them to add and edit content, the basic idea of a set of edited documentation is now challenged with a social network of participating customers, all of whom may now edit, add, and delete content. How social can you go? This article is an attempt to look at the process of evaluating the use of a wiki for end-user documentation, if such a thing can exist. Are the two types of customer content--wikis and end-user documentation--mutually exclusive?

Albing, Bill. KeyContent.org (2007). Articles>Documentation>Wikis>Social Networking

94.
#34417

Wiki-fying Docs: Is Using Customer-Accessible Wikis for End-User Documentation Gaining Momentum?

While the effort to provide more interactivity and power to the end-user seems to suggest that we open up a wiki to allow them to add and edit content, the basic idea of a set of edited documentation is now challenged with a social network of participating customers, all of whom may now edit, add, and delete content. How social can you go? This article is an attempt to look at the process of evaluating the use of a wiki for end-user documentation, if such a thing can exist. Are the two types of customer content — wikis and end-user documentation — mutually exclusive?

Kent, Betsy and Bill Albing. KeyContent.org (2009). Articles>Documentation>Content Management>Wikis

95.
#28272

Wiki-mania   (PDF)

Wikipedia may be the biggest technical document ever created, but it and other Web 2.0 elements present challenges. Read about the popularity of Wikipedia, then let Intercom know about your professional experiences using wikis, blogs, and other Web 2.0 applications.

Intercom (2006). Articles>Web Design>Information Design>Wikis

96.
#31119

Wikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Collaboration

The true collaboration occurs when people have the possibility to co-work on the same sub-task, activating a mechanism of new knowledge creation. Collaboration is not so obvious if is not clearly supported: the risk is to exchange this 'together' learning process with a simple cooperation process, producing not new knowledge but only a simple addition of individual regress knowledge.

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2008). Articles>Content Management>Collaboration>Wikis

97.
#31118

Wikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Flexibility

A flexible workplace is characterized by the capability of individuals to manage not only their work, time or resources, but also the possibility to influence and operate in an active way inside the community (from team to organizational level) and for these reasons to be part of the operational process.

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2008). Articles>Content Management>Workflow>Wikis

98.
#31122

Wikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Openness

Strictly linked with transparency concept, openness is at the base of the principle that people work better if they have access to the right information and possibility to assume that all over the organization. The simple access to other group member data or the possibility to know activities scheduled also in other groups are normal operations in a mature context such as is allowed to look to other team solutions or results in order to decide something for the own team.

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2008). Articles>Content Management>Collaboration>Wikis

99.
#31121

Wikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Peering

A common element between Wiki philosophy and innovation successful case histories, is the partial or total absence of structure or, saying better, of hierarchy. The possibility, in fact, to contribute in the same way, indifferently at which level you are involved in the organization, is one of the first steps towards the reduction of barriers to collaboration, participation and involvement in the organizational life.

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2008). Articles>Content Management>Collaboration>Wikis

100.
#31120

Wikibility Cultural Key Drivers: Sharing

The possibility of sharing improves an effective distribution of common resources (meeting room, projector, corporate car...). In a more general acceptation of the term, the availability to ideas or previous solutions useful for different use is an advantage that make co-creation of new knowledge and a healthy circulation of knowledge possible.

Cammarata, Vincenzo. Grow Your Wiki (2008). Articles>Content Management>Collaboration>Wikis

 
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