A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Web Design>Accessibility

496 found. Page 1 of 20.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20  NEXT PAGE »

 

1.
#33473

Access 2.0

The point of this blog is to look at all the things happening on the web now and in the future; the good, the bad and the downright fugly. But we'll be looking at it from the point of view of inclusivity.

BBC. Resources>Web Design>Accessibility>Blogs

2.
#21846

Access Ability   (PDF)

More and more Web surfers are vision-impaired. Can they understand your site?

Williams, Maxine. Adobe Magazine (1999). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

3.
#20059

Access All Sights

If your company has a public website, it needs to be accessible - and that's the law.

Joseph, Cliff. Guardian Unlimited, The (2003). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>United Kingdom

4.
#23081

The Access Board

The Access Board is an independent Federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities. It operates with about 30 staff and a governing board of representatives from Federal departments and public members appointed by the President.

Access Board, The. Organizations>Web Design>Accessibility>Government

5.
#35856

Access is Good

Yesterday we launched a new version of our developer community website. It doesn’t have many ‘community’ features as yet but that’s all to come. One thing it does now have is an HTML version of all of our product documentation, in an easily searchable format. This new format of the product documentation is largely to move us away from PDF only documentation. At present we still have a set of PDFs but they aren’t particularly usable.

McLean, Gordon. One Man Writes (2009). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Documentation

6.
#27725

Access Key, HTML Accesskey Generated by JavaScript

One of the great advantages of using first letter of the link text as access key is that it can be generated by code. Conventional wisdom states that it should be done server-side. Bad that it is much easier with JavaScript.

Tverskov, Jesper. Smack the Mouse (2003). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>JavaScript

7.
#19644

Accessibility

Internet technologies have provided many Canadians with an enhanced sense of intellectual and economic freedom. But for many people, gaining entry to Web content is more complicated than clicking mouse and operating a modem. Some Canadians rely on assistive technologies such as text readers, audio players and voice activated devices to overcome the barriers presented by standard technologies. Others may be limited by their own technology. But old browsers, non-standard operating systems, slow connections, small screens or text-only screens should not stand in the way of obtaining information that is available to others.

Treasury Board of Canada (2000). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

8.
#27300

Accessibility

Since the discourse over creating accessible Web pages began, the standards organizations that helped inform the new Federal rules have stressed the separation of design and content. If the Internet is to reach its full potential, content will need to be authored so that it can be rendered by a broad array of devices: browsers, assistive technologies, PDAs, and devices that have yet to be imagined. Only by separating content from design will this be possible. By following the rules in Section 508, you will be doing more than providing access for those with disabilities; you will be creating content that is available to all users, no matter what devices are used to read it.

Apple Inc. (2006). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Section 508

9.
#28329

Accessibility   (PDF)

Web sites should be designed to ensure that everyone, including users who have difficulty seeing, hearing, and making precise movements, can use them. Generally, this means ensuring that Web sites facilitate the use of common assistive technologies. All United States Federal Government Web sites must comply with the Section 508 Federal Accessibility Standards.

Usability.gov (2006). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Section 508

10.
#37534

Accessibility

"The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect." - Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web The Web is fundamentally designed to work for all people, whatever their hardware, software, language, culture, location, or physical or mental ability. When the Web meets this goal, it is accessible to people with a diverse range of hearing, movement, sight, and cognitive ability. Thus the impact of disability is radically changed on the Web because the Web removes barriers to communication and interaction that many people face in the physical world. However, when websites, web technologies, or web tools are badly designed, they can create barriers that exclude people from using the Web. The mission of the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is to lead the Web to its full potential to be accessible, enabling people with disabilities to participate equally on the Web. Contents: * why: the case for web accessibility * what: examples of web accessibility * how: make your website and web tools accessible * Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at W3C learn more

Henry, Shawn Lawton and Liam McGee. W3C (2010). Resources>Web Design>Accessibility

11.
#23822

Accessibility and Cascading Style Sheets

An essay from an accessibility class, on the use of CSS to increase access to a page.

Bartlett, Kynn. HTML Writers Guild (1999). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>CSS

12.
#20048

Accessibility and Macromedia Flash MX 2004

Macromedia Flash MX 2004 helps to accelerate accessible application development with a core set of UI components. These components can automate many of the most common accessibility practices related to labeling, keyboard access, and testing and help to ensure a consistent user experience across rich applications created with Macromedia Flash MX 2004. For each component, the designer or developer need only enable the accessibility object by using the command enableAccessibility(). This includes the accessibility object with the component as the movie is compiled. Because there is no simple means of removing an object once it has been added to the component, these options are turned off by default. It is therefore very important that the designer or developer enable accessibility for each component. This step needs to be done only once for each component; it is not necessary to enable accessibility for each instance of a component.

Adobe (2003). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Flash

13.
#36280

Accessibility and Social Media

Social media can be a terrific way to share information with your customers, provide them with crucial support, and otherwise communicate with them. Although there is little you can do to compensate accessibility problems while you are visiting Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube, there are many things you can do to make shared information on those sites easier for your customers to access.

Dolson, Joseph C. Practical eCommerce (2010). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Social Networking

14.
#19037

Accessibility Arguments Revisited

Frontend has recently completed the delivery of the first version (1.1) of the Irish National Disability Authority (NDA) IT Accessibility Guidelines. In the course of our work for the NDA over the last year we’ve talked to a wide variety groups and individuals who have an interest in accessibility and as a result of their input, our approach has shifted a little. Here’s what we found out.

Poskitt, Henry. Frontend Infocentre (2002). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Usability

15.
#32838

Accessibility as Part of The Search Engine Marketing Strategy

In traditional marketing you're looking to define your targeted audience for your business or organisation. In Internet marketing things work in the same way. Unfortunately, with the growing popularity of the Internet in the past years and with the growing number of people building sites, a certain part of the online audience has been overlooked.

Big Mouth Media (2004). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Search Engine Optimization

16.
#28470

Accessibility Audit vs. Accessibility Testing

Article outlining the difference between the two accessibility evaluation methods: The accessibility audit and accessibility testing.

Moss, Trenton. Webcredible (2007). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Methods

17.
#37262

Accessibility Does Not Prevent You from Using JavaScript or Flash

A common misconception is that in order to make a website accessible you have to abstain from using JavaScript or Flash. Almost every time I hold a workshop on Web standards and accessibility there is at least one participant who believes that accessibility limits what they can do on the Web by telling them to stay away from anything that isn’t pure HTML.

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2010). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Flash

18.
#20659

Accessibility Features of CSS

This document summarizes the features of the Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), level 2 Recommendation ([CSS2]) known to directly affect the accessibility of Web documents. Some of the accessibility features described in this document were available in CSS1 ([CSS1]) as well. This document has been written so that other documents may refer in a consistent manner to the accessibility features of CSS.

W3C. Design>Web Design>Accessibility>CSS

19.
#25097

Accessibility from the Ground Up

This accessibility thing sure is catching on. And it’s ready for prime time. Yes, Web accessibility is growing up.

May, Matt. Digital Web Magazine (2005). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

20.
#25088

An Accessibility Frontier: Cognitive Disabilities and Learning Difficulties

With this paper... we are primarily concerned with the problems people with cognitive and learning difficulties might have when using the web and offering a few practical suggestions on how these problems might be addressed.

Hudson, Roger, Russ Weakley and Peter Firminger. Usability.com.au (2005). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Cognitive Psychology

21.
#26675

The Accessibility Hat Trick: Getting Abbreviations Right

AAA-level compliance is the ideal of accessibility, the bonus-round of accessible design: AAA-level compliant pages meet the needs of every group of users. AAA is achievable, but requires preparation and forethought.

Lieberman, Colin. List Apart, A (2006). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

22.
#32994

Accessibility Humanized

Most web developers act in blindness when they design accessible websites, since they know next to nothing about disabled people and the technology they use. Accessibility guidelines and validation tools doesn't provide this insight. Accessibility should rather be approached from a user centred perspective.

Olsen, Henrik. GUUUI (2004). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility

23.
#24752

Accessibility Humanized: A User-Centred Approach to Web Accessibility

Most web developers act in blindness when they design accessible websites, since they know next to nothing about disabled people and the technology they use. Accessibility guidelines and validation tools doesn't provide this insight. Accessibility should rather be approached from a user centred perspective.

Olsen, Henrik. GUUUI (2004). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>User Centered Design

24.
#10126

Accessibility in Design

The next time you open a Web browser, try this: don’t use your mouse. Use your keyboard to navigate through your favorite site. You may very well find that keyboard navigation is not at all straightforward. On Yahoo.com, for example, you must press the Tab key over 75 times to get to all the options on the home page, and you must press the Tab key 10 times just to get to the main Search frame. Many sites, such as those that extensively use Macromedia Flash, aren’t accessible using the keyboard at all. The problems described here are problems of accessibility. In some cases, relatively minor changes can make the difference between an information design that can be used by anyone and a design that excludes people with certain disabilities – or preferences.

Birge, Colin. EServer (2001). Design>Accessibility>Web Design

25.
#32839

Accessibility Is Just Another Language

Although typically we think of accessibility in terms of visual, hearing, dexterity, cognitive disabilities and so on, this concept of disability is very limiting in terms of the need for accessible technology. More than 50 million Americans have some sort of disability, and the numbers are increasing as the population ages. Tens of millions of people in the European Union (EU) and half a million worldwide have a disability. Disability knows no boundaries, languages or borders.

Broin, Ultan Ó. Multilingual (2004). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility

 
 NEXT PAGE »

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon