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Web Design

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User experience design is a subset of the field of experience design which pertains to the creation of the architecture and interaction models which impact a user's perception of a device or system. The scope of the field is directed at affecting 'all aspects of the user’s interaction with the product: how it is perceived, learned, and used.'

 

76.
#31101

Accessible Data Visualization with Web Standards

When designing interfaces for browsing data-driven sites, creating navigation elements that are also visualization tools helps the user make better decisions. Wilson Miner demonstrates three techniques for incorporating data visualization into standards-based navigation patterns.

Minor, Wilson. List Apart, A (2008). Design>Web Design>Graphic Design>Charts and Graphs

77.
#20856

Accessible Design for Users With Disabilities

Making the Web more accessible for users with various disabilities is to a great extent a matter of using HTML the way it was intended: to encode meaning rather than appearance. As long as a page is coded for meaning, it is possible for alternative browsers to present that meaning in ways that are optimized for the abilities of individual users and thus facilitate the use of the Web by disabled users.

Nielsen, Jakob. Alertbox (1996). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

78.
#32496

Accessible Expanding and Collapsing Menu

A website’s navigation should, in my opinion, be visible and straightforward, not hidden away like this or in flyout/dropdown menus. But...

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2007). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>DHTML

79.
#32921

Accessible Folksonomies

I’ve been thinking about one particular artifact of the folksonomy phenomenon — the folksonomy menu that serves as a sort of buzz index providing users with a quick visualization of the most popular tags (technically I think it’s called a weighted list). Popular tags are displayed in a larger font and it’s relatively easy to identify hot topics at a glance. This visual representation of the popularity of any given tag is undeniably cool. However, once the coolness factor wears off it becomes fairly obvious that these menus are also not very accessible.

alt tags (2005). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Metadata

80.
#33131

Accessible Forms

This document is concerned with what the user of a Website form "sees" and interacts with. It outlines how you can create forms for the Web that are more accessible and describes the appropriate use of.

Hudson, William. Webusability (2004). Articles>Web Design>Usability>Forms

81.
#26154

Accessible Graphs and Charts Online

Most government web writers are knowledgeable about alt-text by now... or at least semi-knowledgeable. But sometimes, alt-text is not enough.

McAlpine, Rachel. Quality Web Content (2004). Design>Accessibility>Web Design>Charts and Graphs

82.
#34001

Accessible HTML/XHTML Forms

Forms are often the most tricky aspect of web development for beginners to get their head around, largely because it means stepping out of the comfort zone of one-way information - no longer are you simply presenting information at the person viewing your site, now you are asking for input, for feedback that you have to process in some way. And just as it may be difficult for HTML beginners to understand just how they handle form data, so is it difficult to understand some of the issues relating to accessibility.

Lloyd, Ian. Web Standards Project (2004). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Forms

83.
#22957

An Accessible Method of Hiding HTML Content

Though somewhat rare, there are occasions when the accessibility needs of screen reader users appear to be at odds with the needs of visual users. This kind of conflict occurs when Web developers put form elements inside of a data table matrix, when they want to use images as headings instead of text, and in other situations. Adding extra text helps screen reader users, but can complicate the visual layout, thus reducing understandability. One solution is to use CSS to hide the text from sighted users in a way that is still accessible to screen readers. The details of this technique are discussed, along with the technical reasoning behind it.

Bohman, Paul. WebAIM (2002). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

84.
#35894

Accessible Online Video for Keyboard-Only Users

Sorted out transcripts and subtitles to make your online videos accessible? This is important, but there are other accessibility considerations which are often overlooked. Here are some other things you must consider.

Moss, Trenton. Webcredible (2009). Articles>Accessibility>Video>Web Design

85.
#25503

Accessible Pop-up Links

Sometimes we have to use pop-ups — so we might as well do them right. This article will show you how to make them more accessible and reliable while simplifying their implementation.

Chassot, Caio. List Apart, A (2004). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>CSS

86.
#26648

Accessible Tables

There is no question that the vast majority of tables on the Web are layout tables, used to structure the visual appearance of the page. Often the structure of tables is remarkably complex, with tables nested in tables as much as seven deep.

Thatcher, Jim. JimThatcher.com (2005). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>HTML

87.
#22965

Accessible Taxes? A Blind Consumer's Experience with the US Tax System

One of the most common, and least enjoyable, experiences of citizens of the United States is that of filing income tax forms. This year, Sachin Pavithran, who is blind, attempted to complete the forms and file them without assistance from sighted friends. Find out whether he was successful or not.

Bohman, Paul, Shane Anderson and Sachin Pavithran. WebAIM (2004). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>Government

88.
#28701

Accessible Web 2.0 Applications with WAI-ARIA

Our web applications can suffer from inaccessibility problems due to inherent markup limitations. Martin Kliehm helps us sort through the WAI specs for Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) to increase usability.

Kliehm, Martin. List Apart, A (2007). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Ajax

89.
#23004

Accessible Web Design

We encourage developers of web pages to consider the full spectrum of visitors to their sites. Listed below are some resources that may be helpful in creating pages that are accessible to everyone, including those who have disabilities.

University of Washington-Seattle (2001). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

90.
#22948

Accessible Web Text - Sizing Up the Issues

Explores the issues surrounding text size; explain what all the fuss is about; and suggest some useful approaches you can adopt to ensure the text on your web pages will be readable to your visitors.

Byrne, Jim. MCU (2003). Design>Web Design>Accessibility

91.
#21746

Accessible Web Typography: An Introduction for Web Designers

Text is your flexible friend; it can be transformed into audio or braille; used to describe non-text elements; and be presented visually in an infinite number of sizes.

Byrne, Jim. Scotconnect.com (2003). Design>Typography>Web Design

92.
#20001

AccessibleNet.org

Accessible directory of links and resources to help policymakers and web designers make informed decisions about Web accessibility.

Ogston, Matthew. AccessibleNet (2003). Design>Accessibility>Web Design

93.
#23172

AccessiBlog

AccessiBlog was a weblog of articles and sites dealing with the topic of Web accessibility (though it is no longer updated).

Clark, Joe. AccessiBlog (2003). Resources>Web Design>Accessibility>Blogs

94.
#27162

Accessing Form Elements Array with JavaScript

This article shows how you can access an array of HTML form elements using JavaScript.

DevBay (2005). Design>Web Design>DHTML

95.
#33475

Accessing Information: Not Everyone Does it the Same Way

As some in our profession have come to realize, social media and use of the Web in general have changed (and are still changing) the way in which people access and use information.

DMN Communications (2008). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>User Centered Design

96.
#32887

Accessites.org: The Art of Accessibility

We aim to prove that accessible, usable web sites built with universality and standards in mind need not be boring. We will show you artfully crafted sites made by some of today’s most progressive web developers.

Accessites.org. Resources>Web Design>Accessibility>Blogs

97.
#19633

Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

Robertson, Stuart. List Apart, A (2003). Design>Web Design>Information Design

98.
#22949

Accountability of Accessibility and Usability

Focus on your users, all of them. Learn from mistakes currently made on the Web. If a user can't fill out a form, they can't buy anything from your site. People turned away by unusable sites will probably try a competitor's site. Don't be the site that turned people away. Make your Web site as usable and accessible as possible. It's the business savvy thing to do. It's the right thing to do. If you don't, someone just might force you legally to do it or threaten to sue.

Pavka, Anitra. Digital Web Magazine (2002). Design>Web Design>Accessibility>Usability

99.
#36357

Accuracy in Website Terms and Conditions

For legal documents, accurate information is important. When you use a template, make sure that you customise the content carefully.

TechScribe (2010). Articles>Web Design>Writing>Policies and Procedures

100.
#36115

Achieving Designer–Developer Collaboration and XAML

Collaboration between designers and developers is always great topic to write about. I believe that for the first time that kind of collaboration is possible to full extent and it is possible today. Key element for enabling this is XAML – eXtensible Application Markup Language aka Holy Grail of designer – developer collaboration.

UX Passion (2009). Articles>Web Design>Collaboration>XML

 
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