A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

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176.
#20538

Using Videotaped Presentations Effectively

Using videos to sell a service or product or to inspire and inform associates is becoming common for all kinds of organizations. The latest technologies offer endless opportunities at reasonable cost and with professional results, yet nothing can replace the drama and warmth of a live presentation. It's like the difference between live theater and television- no comparison!

Presenters University (2002). Articles>Presentations>Video

177.
#36330

Vidéo dans le Navigateur: Theora ou H.264 ?

Vous en avez sûrement entendu parler, deux grands acteurs américain du partage de vidéo en ligne, Youtube et Vimeo, ont présenté des pré-versions de leurs lecteurs respectifs en HTML 5.

Nitot, Tristan. Standblog (2010). (French) Articles>Multimedia>Video>Standards

178.
#34137

Video Format Guide

When people talk about video formats, they're referring to something called a container format. The container format is a detailed description of what's inside a video file. It describes the structure of the file, as well as the kind of data that the file contains.

Geeks.com (2009). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Standards

179.
#37954

Video on Demand: Five Key Behaviours and Attitudes

Video on demand is a rapidly changing field. Our user research over several projects highlights the wide range of different hardware set-ups and how these set-ups and the viewing environment influences consumers' evolving habits.

Webb, Philip. Webcredible (2011). Design>Web Design>Video>Usability

180.
#34631

Video, Documentation, and You

Video has the potential for enhancing documentation. But is video the be all, end all? Is it really the next stage in the evolution of documentation? Will it supplant text and static images? This post looks at the pros and cons.

Nesbitt, Scott. DMN Communications (2009). Articles>Documentation>Multimedia>Video

181.
#38861

Video: Documentation - It Doesn't Suck!

Without documentation, you could probably do your taxes, build a new piece of “some assembly required” furniture, or manage a database instance – but you’d probably end up living in prison, living with broken furniture, or living in fear of your servers. Writing documentation might not seem as important or exciting as developing or tuning code, but it keeps database administrators out of prison. Join Jes to learn what you need to capture and what tools to use.

Schultz, Jes. Brent Ozar Unlimited (2013). Articles>Documentation>Multimedia>Video

182.
#29545

Video: The Basis Of Video Conferencing

Video is a Latin word that means 'I see'. This technology includes, capturing, transmitting and replaying visual media. Video is actually the technique of turning a series of still images into moving images and the technology to do this varies through time. Video has come a long way from the black and white images that used to move much like a fast slide show just a couple of decades ago. Live video was made possible with the invention of the 'Vidicon', which was the heart of the video camera. This was first used in television cameras in the large television studios. Today, video cameras come in various shapes and sizes to match the work they are required to do. Small video cameras that fit into the palm of your hand are the most common and inexpensive cameras that produce very high quality images that can be stored on discs or video tape.

Shakir A. Ezine Articles (2007). Articles>Collaboration>Videoconferencing>Online

183.
#24609

Videoconference-Based Courses in Technical Communication: Pros, Cons, and Considerations   (PDF)

Interactive compressed video (ICV), also called videoconferencing, is increasingly popular for distance education. While ICV shares many features with satellite technology, its two-way audio and video make it more interactive and versatile, at a lower cost. The interactivity can help meet the instructor’s concern about appropriate methods for teaching writing. The lower costs, and the versatiliy to send as well as receive courses, can help meet the administrator’s concerns about maximizing the return on investment.

Farrell, Kathleen L. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Education>Online>Videoconferencing

184.
#36226

Videos and Screencasts Have Their Drawbacks, Too

For the last year or so, I’ve heard more than a couple of people (no, Gordon, you’re not one of them) tout video and screencasts as the future of documentation. While video may have killed the radio star, I don’t think that it’s going to kill documentation as we know it. Why? Not everyone wants video as their documentation, or even as part of their documentation. They want information now, and don’t want to wait a couple of minutes to watch a walk through of what they need to do.

Nesbitt, Scott. DMN Communications (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

185.
#32461

Videos on Computer Accessibility

A collection of videos that show how people with various disabilities use assistive technology with their computers, which may help developers understand the diverse accessibility needs that should be met by their projects.

AssistiveWare (2007). Resources>Accessibility>Usability>Video

186.
#27424

Videotaping Student Presentations: A Quick Start Guide

A guide to using MiniDV digital camcorders to record student presentations, then to review them on a computer and copy them to DVD for later review.

Johnson, Rachel. EServer (2006). Academic>Course Materials>Multimedia>Video

187.
#38198

Visual Storytelling Guides: A New Deliverable in Technical Communication?

When I read books to my little girls (ages 5 and 7), the pictures combined with story provide a captivating experience. I’ve often thought that if I wanted to create documentation that people actually read, maybe I should integrate these two same elements: picture and story. I’m not entirely sure what a product would look like that integrates these two elements, because technical writing usually lacks both visuals and story. It usually consists of dry technical procedures written in a list, meant to be read in any order, and stripped down to its most minimalistic expression. So perhaps what I’m envisioning is a different kind of deliverable, rather than a remake of an existing deliverable.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2011). Articles>Documentation>Multimedia>Video

188.
#31474

Web Conferencing Tips

Despite the Internet's emergence as a mainstream business tool, web conferencing can still be a daunting experience for first-timers and even seasoned presenters. For today's business professionals, it's not the technology that makes them apprehensive, but the knowledge that familiar ways of presenting are inadequate to execute an effective web conference. Provide someone with useful information and a little preparation, however, and that person can host an effective, efficient web conference.

Murray, Krysta. Communication World Bulletin (2004). Articles>Collaboration>Teleconferencing>Videoconferencing

189.
#32619

Web Video Compression

Nowadays, broadband connections are widespread amongst the internet. Finally, video can be effectively added to website. But which player and video codec to go for? And how to get your video out there? This article features some tips and tricks for compressing and delivering video to the web.

Wijering, Jeroen. JeroenWijering.com (2008). Articles>Web Design>Video>Standards

190.
#35615

Webinars, Tele-events, Live Podcasts and Web TV Shows are HOT

Have you noticed? There is currently a significant increase in the number of participants attending virtual events such as webinars, tele-events, live podcasts and web TV shows.

Schoen, Michelle. Virtual Assistant Demo Girl (2009). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Podcasting

191.
#34448

Weer Not Bad Spelerz

Whether you are a new caption viewer or someone who has been using captions for many years, as you watch captioning, the thought may cross your mind that the captioner either (a) is from a foreign country and has little facility in spelling or (b) is a lazy typist who doesn't want to check their spelling some of the time. Nothing could be further from the truth.

White, Patty. Caption Colorado (2009). Articles>Accessibility>Video

192.
#36108

What Is a Screencast?

If you want to teach someone else how to use your new software or web service there is little that comes close to the effectiveness of a good screencast. A screencast is nothing else that a screen recording accompanied by an audio commentary done by the screencaster explaining what is happening on the screen as it happens.

Good, Robin. Master New Media (2006). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

193.
#34655

What Is Screencasting

A screencast is a digital movie in which the setting is partly or wholly a computer screen, and in which audio narration describes the on-screen action. It's not a new idea. The screencaster's tools—for video capture, editing, and production of compressed files—have long been used to market software products, and to train people in the use of those products. What's new is the emergence of a genre of documentary filmmaking that tells stories about software-based cultures like Wikipedia, del.icio.us, and content remixing. These uses of the medium, along with a new breed of lightweight software demonstrations, inspired the collaborative coining of a new term, screencast.

Udell, Jon. O'Reilly and Associates (2005). Articles>Documentation>Video>Screencasting

194.
#36105

What Is Screencasting

A screencast is a digital movie in which the setting is partly or wholly a computer screen, and in which audio narration describes the on-screen action. It's not a new idea. The screencaster's tools—for video capture, editing, and production of compressed files—have long been used to market software products, and to train people in the use of those products. What's new is the emergence of a genre of documentary filmmaking that tells stories about software-based cultures like Wikipedia, del.icio.us, and content remixing. These uses of the medium, along with a new breed of lightweight software demonstrations, inspired the collaborative coining of a new term, screencast.

Udell, Jon. O'Reilly and Associates (2005). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

195.
#36358

What is Unclear About Captioning?

Does your business know about the need for captioning?This recent article might be a wake-up call for people in the United States: Who is Required to Close-Caption? With only a few exceptions, all programming for broadcast in the United States must be closed captioned. Fortunately, the article includes the FCC fact sheet for more closed captioning information.

Mardahl, Karen and Lisa Pappas. STC AccessAbility SIG (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Accessibility>Video

196.
#36557

Why I’m Avoiding AVCHD

AVCHD is a high compression codec based on H.264, which has a proven track record for great quality and good file size. While H.264 is a standard, AVCHD is only supported by a handful of camcorder manufacturers and software applications. Not even Adobe’s flagship Premiere Pro supports AVCHD without an expensive plugin. However, AVCHD is much more taxing on the editing computer than something like MPEG-2 or even regular H.264.

Stamatiou, Paul. PaulStamatiou.com (2008). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Standards

197.
#35611

Why Is It Important for Video Tutorials to Be User-Led?

When it comes to video tutorials, long narrations quickly tire the audience. Why is that? The same reason my kids prefer the beach over Disneyworld: most videos are not user-led.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2009). Articles>Documentation>Tutorials>Video

198.
#31943

Why We Need Technical Communicators

A YouTube video of a terrible (!) presenter discussing the technical intricacies of a product, using the worst possible language.

Harkness, Holly E. Don't Call Me Tina (2008). Humor>TC>Multimedia>Video

199.
#34671

Working with Audio Tracks in Macromedia Captivate

The inclusion of audio in online learning courses not only greatly enhances learners' experiences, it also ensures that your courses are accessible to a wide audience. In this article I explore the various ways you can add audio to your Captivate projects. I also provide a number of tips on adding a narration to product demonstrations and presentations.

Fletcher, Mark. Adobe (2004). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screen Captures

200.
#25913

Working with Cameras

Creating visual depth in a project can really catapult an animation from boring to captivating. After Effects does 3D very well, but there's more to it than simply moving layers or objects around in 3D space.

Anderson, Chad J.W. Mac Design Magazine (2005). Design>Multimedia>Video>Adobe After Effects

 
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