A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Reference>Style Guides

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1.
#13518

Apple Publications Style Guide (2003)   (PDF)

An updated version of the style guide used by writers and editors in Apple publications groups.

Apple Inc. (2003). Reference>Style Guides>Technical Writing>Technical Writing

2.
#13275

Avoiding Insensitive and Offensive Language

Suggestions for avoiding language that reinforces stereotypes or excludes certain groups of people. Includes examples of sentences and words to avoid, and replacements for them. Includes the following topics: Sexism, Race and Ethnicity, Age, Sexual Orientation, Depersonalization of Persons with Disabilities or Illnesses, Patronizing or Demeaning Expressions, and Language That Excludes or Emphasizes Differences.

Nichols, Wendalyn. Random House. Reference>Style Guides>Discrimination>Ethnicity

3.
#24018

Catching Errors in Internet Addresses

Internet addresses have been proliferating in publications, and they're not going to go away. Editors unfamiliar with the Net may see these addresses as incomprehensible blocks of characters that can't be understood or analyzed into components. But learning a little about their structure can help prevent you from publishing erroneous addresses.

Ivey, Keith C. Editorial Eye, The (1997). Reference>Style Guides

4.
#18296

Chico State Writing Style Guide

When editors refer to style, they usually do not mean an individual's writing style; they mean editorial style—the guidelines a publisher uses to enhance the reader's understanding. Editorial style includes the consistent use of spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and abbreviations, as well as the selection of headings and the use of numbers. These guidelines are often called 'conventions' because they represent a conventional presentation used in publishing.

California State University (2002). Reference>Style Guides>Writing

5.
#10644

Common Errors in English

Offers an extensive list of commonly confused words, their definitions and the correct way to use them.

Brians, Paul. Washington State University. Reference>Style Guides>Grammar

6.
#10715

Commonly Confused Words

A list of frequently used and sometimes misused words, their definitions and examples of their correct usage.

Author's Guide (2001). Reference>Style Guides

7.
#25797

Confusing Words

Confusing Words is a collection of words that are troublesome to readers and writers. Words are grouped according to the way they are most often confused or misused.

Confusing Words. Reference>Style Guides>Diction

8.
#10712

Deadwood Phrases   (PDF)

Lists common phrases that make wordy documents and makes suggestions for replacing them.

Author's Guide (2000). Reference>Style Guides

9.
#26195
10.
#10768

Documenting Electronic Sources

The Internet is a widely used tool for research, but unfortunately, style manuals contain little information on how to document electronic sources. This page contains links to sources which will help students, teachers, and anybody doing research on the Internet to cite such sources using different styles. Some links come from 'Cyber Citations,' an article by Michael A. Arnzen, which appeared in Internet World in September 1996. Some of the addresses were no longer current and are updated here, and many more have been added.

Purdue University. Reference>Style Guides>Research

11.
#24076

The Economist Style Guide

This guide is based on the style book which is given to all journalists at The Economist.

Economist, The (2004). Reference>Style Guides>Journalism>United Kingdom

12.
#24076

The Economist Style Guide

This guide is based on the style book which is given to all journalists at The Economist.

Economist, The (2016). Reference>Style Guides>Journalism>United Kingdom

13.
#24671

EERE Communication Standards and Guidelines

The development and dissemination of new communication standards and guidelines are evolving processes that require cooperation, teamwork, and clear communication.

U.S. Department of Energy (2004). Reference>Style Guides

14.
#10232

The Elements of Style

Asserting that one must first know the rules to break them, this classic reference book is a must-have for any student and conscientious writer. Intended for use in which the practice of composition is combined with the study of literature, it gives in brief space the principal requirements of plain English style and concentrates attention on the rules of usage and principles of composition most commonly violated.

Strunk, William, Jr. and E.B. White. Bartleby.com (1959). Reference>Style Guides>Writing>Rhetoric

15.
#14475

Engineering Communicator's Manual

This manual is intended to be used by any engineering student (undergraduate or graduate) who has to complete writing assignments or oral presentations for any course. You will find information on general principles of grammar and style, as well as specific examples of technical writing and presenting. If your communication assignment is for an engineering class, you will want to pay particular attention to the sample documents.

Hart, Hillary. University of Texas. Reference>Style Guides>Engineering

16.
#14139

Example Style Guide   (PDF)

This document accompanies the TECHWR-L article 'Developing a Style Guide,' and includes a sample outline of a style guide. Some of the sections include some detailed sample text; others do not. Please note that the examples shown here are not necessarily the 'correct' choices, or the 'preferred' choices, or the 'best' choices; they are simply examples of things to include. Your project may require additional items, especially if your writing will be used on a Web site.

Weber, Jean Hollis. TECHWR-L (1998). Reference>Style Guides

17.
#23899

Garbl's Style Manual

This manual mostly follows Associated Press style but also follows advice of other excellent books on writing and Web sites listed in Garbl's Writing Resources Online -- and my selection and interpretation of their guidelines. This guide focuses on U.S. standards for spelling, punctuation, definitions, usage, style and grammar.

Garbl's Writing Center. Reference>Style Guides

18.
#23963

GNOME Documentation Style Guide

The GNOME Documentation Style Guide provides guidelines for authors who want to contribute to the GNOME Documentation Project.

GNOME (2004). Reference>Style Guides>Documentation>Linux

19.
#10615

Going to Bat Against the Dictionary

The T-shirt, commonly misspelled 'tee shirt,' is so named because it resembles the letter T when spread out. Tee ball, commonly misspelled 'T-ball,' is so named because a ball is hit off a tee. Is that so difficult? Apparently it is. Unanimously, as far as I can tell, dictionaries favor the non-informative T-ball. Some of those dictionaries don't even recognize tee ball as an alternate spelling. Some very smart people think I'm out of my mind for having such strong feelings in favor of the tee- version.

Slot, The (2001). Reference>Style Guides

20.
#13404

The Good Grammar, Good Style™ Pages

Do you have a question about style, grammar, or mechanics? Find the answer to your questions in the Good Grammar, Good Style Archive — over 100 pages of useful articles and frequently asked questions!

Factotum Ink, Limited (2002). Reference>Style Guides>Grammar

21.
#10655

Grammar

A website about English grammar for students.

Verkouteren, J. Adrian. St. Albans School (1998). Reference>Style Guides>Grammar

22.
#11851

Grammar, Spelling, and Punctuation

A guide on punctuation, capitals, spelling, sentence construction and parts of speech.

Purdue University (1998). Reference>Style Guides>Grammar

23.
#25798

GrammarNOW

This site is dedicated to answering grammar, composition, or formatting questions.

GrammarNOW. Reference>Style Guides>Grammar

24.
#18852

A Guide for Writing Research Papers Based on Modern Language Association (MLA) Documentation

The formatting of citations recommended in this guide is based on Modern Language Association recommendations. This guide may suffice for most students' needs for most academic purposes, but for advanced research projects it is by no means a substitute for the Modern Language Association Handbook for Writers of Research Papers Fifth Edition (1999). That handbook can be purchased in most bookstores and copies should be available in every college and municipal library. A Guide similar to this one, but based on the APA style, is also available online (see link on the navigation bar). Your best source of advice on all these matters is, of course, your instructor and library professionals.

Capital Community College (2002). Reference>Style Guides

25.
#21628

Guide to Citation Style Guides

An annotated collection of links to the best and most up-to-date citation guides that show how to properly cite resources from the Internet. Style guides for APA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, BSE, styles and a description of how to cite references from Lexis/Nexis.

Tonella, Karla. University of Iowa. Reference>Style Guides

 
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