A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

RSI

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1.
#26953

Amara's RSI Page

I will examine this unfortunate side effect, Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI), of the Digital Age in this essay. It has probably affected someone you know. I hope this information will cause you to pause, look at your computer setup and initiate changes that make your computing safer and more comfortable. And if you've already experienced some of RSI's disabling and career-threatening effects, I hope that this article eases some of your anxieties by describing methods, approaches and treatments that have helped others.

Amara.com (1999). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Ergonomics>RSI

2.
#23278

Avoiding Repetitive-Stress Injuries: A Guide for the Technical Communicator

Writers and editors in particular put in an awful lot of miles at the keyboard every day. One serious problem is the risk of so-called 'repetitive-stress injury' (RSI)--simplistically, any injury that results from overuse of a body part without giving it time to recover. In fact, 'overuse injury' is probably a more immediately obvious term, and given how much time many of us spend using computers, overuse is indeed a risk.

Hart, Geoffrey J.S. TECHWR-L (2004). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Ergonomics>RSI

3.
#26124

Avoiding Repetitive-Stress Injuries: A Guide for the Technical Communicator

Writers and editors in particular put in an awful lot of miles at the keyboard every day. For example, I commonly spend a solid 8 hours typing. Writers and editors in particular put in an awful lot of miles at the keyboard every day. For example, I commonly spend a solid 8 hours typing. Then there's that darned mouse. W. Wayt Gibbs, writing in the June 2002 Scientific American, used the Mouse Odometer software (www.modometer.com) to monitor his habits and found that in a single 5-day period, he'd recorded 2440 feet of mouse movement and nearly 22 000 mouse clicks. It's no wonder computer users sometimes experience serious physical problems.It's no wonder computer users sometimes experience serious physical problems.

Hart, Geoffrey J.S. TECHWR-L (2005). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Ergonomics>RSI

4.
#30308

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Have you ever been working at the computer so long that your eyes 'went buggy?' Or so intensely that you could barely move when you got up? Working long hours at a computer may be more hazardous than you know. One real possibility is that you will develop Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS).

Rollins, Cindy. Boston Broadside (1991). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Biomedical>RSI

5.
#37246

How Can the Computer be Harmful to You?

In most of our articles, we discuss the importance of making technologies accessible. While doing so, we talk a lot about compensating for all types of disabilities. However, we’d also like you to know that there is a lot you can do to avoid long-term health issues which would later require you to use technologies for people with disabilities. Below we discuss these computer-related health issues and how you can minimize and avoid their negative effects.

Babinszki, Tom. Even Grounds (2010). Articles>Technology>Ergonomics>RSI

6.
#14502

Repetitive Stress Injury Prevention  (link broken)

I received a lot of email following my post asking about writing-specific ergonomics and wrist-strengthening exercises. A lot of people wanted to know what they can do to avoid several common work-related injuries, including: repetitive strain injuries; carpal tunnel syndrome; sore hands, arms, necks, backs; and mousing strain.

Hart, Rowena. TECHWR-L (1999). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Ergonomics>RSI

7.
#10487

When A Little Twinge Means Big Problems: Avoiding RSI  (link broken)

Could you be doing irreparable damage to your hands and wrists simply by working at the computer for a few hours every day? It may sound like an exaggeration, but for some people even two hours per day of steady typing can cause serious physical problems. The culprit? Repetitive strain injury (RSI)—a condition that can damage the nerves, tendons, and muscles of the freelancer's most basic tool—the hands. RSI can affect the arms, elbows, shoulders, back, and neck. Recovery can require months of rest and physical therapy; for some people, the damage is severe enough that they may never be able to use a computer again. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 332,000 new RSI cases are diagnosed each year.

Milite, George A. Editorial Freelancers Association (1997). Articles>Human Computer Interaction>Ergonomics>RSI

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