A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Quick Reference

7 found.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

 

1.
#37864

Give the Perfect Gift this Season: A Laminated Quick Reference Guide

I was surprised and mildly pleased this weekend to see my sister-in-law Karin give a quick reference guide or “cheat sheet,” as she called it, to her grandma for her birthday. The guide focused on accessing and sending email in Gmail. Grandma was grateful and elated to see the work and detail that went into the guide, which was laminated and narrow enough to prop up next to her [ancient] computer.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2010). Articles>Document Design>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

2.
#35804

Quick Reference Guides Are More Useful Than a 150-Page User Doc

I’m working on a project to boil a 150-page software user document down to a one-page reference guide that can be tacked to a CSR’s cube wall. Our goal with the one-page reference guide is to give the CSR a description of all the navigation elements and application functionality so they can quickly navigate to where they want to go without first having to trudge through the complete 150-page user doc.

Creel, Ron. Your Writing Dept (2009). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

3.
#34252

Quick Reference Guides: Short and Sweet Documentation

In this article, my colleague and I provide strategies, tips, and approaches we’ve learned in creating quick reference guides for software documentation projects.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2009). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

4.
#38295

Quick Reference Guides: Short and Sweet Documentation

Users often want documentation in a format that will give them the basics and get them on their way as fast as possible. Quick reference guides provide a short version of a manual, condensed from dozens or hundreds of pages down to just one double-sided sheet of paper. Despite the brevity of quick reference material, the thought process involved in creating, organizing, and laying out the content is time consuming. The format requires you to assess the content and decide the most important information the user needs to know. You must describe with extreme concision and clarity processes that usually require dozens of pages to explain.

Johnson, Tom H. and Benjamin Minson. Writers UA (2010). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

5.
#34382

Quick Reference Guides: Short and Sweet Technical Documentation   (PDF)

Users often want documentation in a format that will give them the basics and get them on their way as fast as possible. Quick reference guides provide a short version of a manual, condensed from dozens or hundreds of pages down to just one double-sided sheet of paper. Despite the brevity of quick reference material, the thought process involved in creating, organizing, and laying out the content is time consuming. The format requires you to assess the content and decide the most important information the user needs to know. You must describe with extreme concision and clarity processes that usually require dozens of pages to explain. This article provides an overview of the strategies, tips, challenges, and benefits we have learned in using quick reference guides for our documentation projects.

Johnson, Tom H. and Benjamin Minson. Gryphon Mountain (2009). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

6.
#35714

Quick-Start Guides Require a Minimalist Mindset

The point of a quick-start guide is, as the name says, to help the users get on their feet as fast as possible. This requires the writer to ask, “What is the absolute minimum that someone needs in order to get started?” The next best question is “What is the user going to do the most often?”

Minson, Benjamin. Gryphon Mountain (2008). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

7.
#34639

Starting Points with Quick Reference Guides: Gathering Before Designing

Dan Roam explains that drawing pictures can help you solve problems. He says the first rule is to “collect everything possible up front.” After collecting all your information, you then “lay it all out where you can look at it.” By laying out all the information, you can grasp the whole of it, make connections between various parts, see the important sections, and recognize patterns.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2009). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Quick Reference

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon