A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Marketing

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151.
#18909

Marketing Technology in an Information Systems Environment   (PDF)

As an Information Systems/Marketing department liaison, you are a 'translator' for two foreign lands: Techcom and Marcom. A skilled translator must juggle the IS department’s concern that information is factual and the marketing department’s need for information that sells the product. When you take into account the concerns of both departments, you can simplify your writing task by producing component-oriented material that you can reuse for technical and marketing purposes.

Hines Kurfman, Cindy. STC Proceedings (2002). Articles>Technology>Marketing

152.
#31243

Marketing to Different Generations: Choose Your Message Wisely

There has been a lot of buzz lately about the dynamic created by having four generations in the workforce at once. Dozens of experts, myself included, have spent hours with businesses worldwide to help management better understand how to connect with employees by learning how a generational perspective can color the world and affect business relationships.

Marston, Cam. Communication World Bulletin (2007). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing

153.
#20106

Marketing Writer’s Survival Guide   (PDF)

Marketing writers face project demands and challenges that are different from those in other forms of technical communication. This session will be a highly interactive discussion between the presenters and the participants, sharing tips and techniques for surviving as a marketing writer in all aspects of a marketing communication project.

King, Janice M. and Lawrence D. Kunz. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing

154.
#30522

Marketing Writing for Technical Products   (PDF)

This workshop will examine the types of marketing materials that can give you creative experience. You'll learn how to adapt your skills and subject matter knowledge to these projects, how to plan and develop different types of materials, and how to identify opportunities for new types of communication.

King, Janice M. STC Proceedings (1993). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing>Technical Writing

155.
#31425

Marketing Your Business

This month's column doesn't focus on business strategy per se, but rather on how independents market themselves once they identify their markets and know what it is they want to convey.

Steigman, Daria. Communication World Bulletin (2005). Careers>Freelance>Marketing

156.
#27843

Marketing Yourself

Marketing yourself is an attitude, not an activity. It is learning to think of yourself and your skills as a product that someone can use.

West, Elizabeth. Editorial Freelancers Association (1990). Careers>Freelance>Marketing

157.
#24357

Marketing Yourself and Your Business   (PDF)

Marketing is what we do to get and keep customers. The best marketing is effective and efficient -- it delivers the 'best bang for the buck.' To create such marketing, you need to form a strategic plan from your knowledge of the product or service, the market, your competition, and the goals you want to achieve. Then you must develop and implement a creative plan, including specific tasks and products (ads or brochures, for example) to achieve those goals.

Brenneman, Judy Fort. STC Proceedings (1998). Careers>Management>Marketing

158.
#18908

Marketing Yourself as a Marketing Writer   (PDF)

Technical communication consultants may find that marketing writing makes an excellent second line of business. Technology companies, marketing services firms, and advertising agencies often use freelancers to write marketing documents. They particularly need good writers who understand technology. This paper discusses the business of freelance marketing writing and how it differs from independent technical writing. Topics include the kinds of projects that marketing writers work on, how development cycles typically differ from those of technical documents, and how to effectively market yourself as a marketing writer.

Massa, Jack A. STC Proceedings (2002). Careers>Collaboration>Marketing>Business Communication

159.
#34414

Marketing: Intertwining The Mobile Revolution

Online through mobile will be, is, WAS the future. Ori Carmel from Ambergreen says that The Future of Mobile Marketing crept up on us while we were looking the other way and is already here.

Carmel, Ori. 160 Characters (2009). Articles>Business Communication>Mobile>Marketing

160.
#31411

Measure Your Reputation Effectively

A good reputation, particularly in an increasingly competitive world, is a must for all companies and organizations. Reputation is a company asset and should always be taken seriously—lose your reputation and you often lose a lot more besides. A good reputation is essential in crisis situations and can help to reduce the impact of negative events and press.

Grant, Nicholas. Communication World Bulletin (2005). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing

161.
#31558

Measuring Integrated Marketing Communication from Start to Finish

Many companies have taken a limited view of the impact that marketing communication can have on overall corporate objectives, reducing their understanding of the value of marketing communication. One reason for this resistance is that the value of IMC can be complex to measure in a world where marketing usually moves at a dynamic pace and is driven by a changing competitive landscape and seemingly unpredictable shifts in customer attitudes. The potential revenue and customer satisfaction benefits of implementing an IMC program can be so dramatic that companies shouldn't ignore the movement any longer.

Woods, Julie. Communication World Bulletin (2003). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing>Assessment

162.
#31560

Measuring Search Engine Marketing ROI

Spending on search engine marketing (SEM) is rising dramatically, yet surprisingly few companies are measuring the effectiveness of their campaigns. In a short survey conducted by web analytics vendor NetIQ, more than 800 participants responded to questions about their search engine marketing efforts and their attempts to measure success. The survey responses provide interesting insights into the state of search engine marketing ROI.

Sherman, Chris. Communication World Bulletin (2003). Articles>Web Design>Marketing>Assessment

163.
#24514

Mentally Correct Product Promo Priorities

Use reponsivity to command or coax customers into acting on your offer.

Streight, Steven. Blogger.com (2004). Articles>Business Communication>Marketing

164.
#30594

The Merging Work of Technical and Marketing Communications   (PDF)

Increasingly, technical communicators are being asked by their companies to participate in marketing efforts. While most of us have long considered user's manuals and other documentation an important ingredient in maintaining customer loyalty, we have accepted that generally our primary function is to instruct people on the use or repair of products. Our job is to make complex information understandable; if in doing so we also make friends of customers and prospective customers, then we are pleasantly surprised.

Palokoff, Kathy. STC Proceedings (1993). Articles>Writing>Technical Writing>Marketing

165.
#25085

The Most Hated Advertising Techniques

Studies of how people react to online advertisements have identified several design techniques that impact the user experience very negatively.

Nielsen, Jakob. Alertbox (2004). Articles>User Centered Design>Marketing

166.
#38354

Moving Towards the “Dark Side”: From Technical Writing to Content Marketing

Without a good plan for awareness, many of the other efforts related to technical writing — good user help, a usable interface, accurate requirements, bug-free functionality, and so on, don’t matter a whole lot.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2011). Careers>Writing>Marketing>Technical Writing

167.
#24818

Multimedia and Interactive Marketing in the Digital Age   (PDF)

What is interactive marketing? How is it different from traditional marketing function? What part does multimedia play in it? Who’s currently doing it and why? Does it replace traditional marketing? Will interactive marketing help companies to better market products and reach customers? These are the questions many companies and individuals are asking. During this panel discussion I will attempt to answer these questions by sharing my thesis research findings on the topic. I will also discuss the future of interactive marketing and the products that will be used to deliver it.

Gibbs, Bruce R. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Multimedia>Marketing

168.
#37741

My Brand Is…

I’ve been thinking lately about my brand. I’ve always hated this marketing term, but the word “brand” does help answer a question. When you think of me, what comes to your mind? I’ve written about a lot of different topics on this blog, everything from findability to podcasting, blogging, technical writing, flare, wikis, screencasts, project managers, content organization, and more.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2010). Careers>Writing>Marketing

169.
#33929

MySpace: The Business of Spam 2.0 (Exhaustive Edition)

Most users believe that MySpace started as some kind of fluke—a happy accident that began in Anderson's bedroom or garage—and many still don't wonder, know, or care about the site's real business history and model. Heralded as a haven of DIY self-expression, MySpace was actually created by executives whose backgrounds are anchored in spam and mass marketing. The real genius of MySpace lies in its re-imagining and repackaging of spam. While most internet users expend time and energy attempting to keep it out, MySpace is spam that they actually invite in.

Douglas, Nick. ValleyWag (2006). Articles>Web Design>Marketing>Case Studies

170.
#35727

Netiquette, Twettiquette: How to Build the Social Media Audiences You Want

How can you build the right following? The question is important because like it or not, as communicators, we’re expected to lead the way in our organizations’ use of social media.

Canavor, Natalie and Claire Meirowitz. Communication World Bulletin (2009). Articles>Business Communication>Social Networking>Marketing

171.
#19789

New Roles for Technical Writers: Technical Marketing Communication   (PDF)

Technical software marketing is a specialty that calls upon skills technical writers already possess. Clear, accurate product information is essential in today’s complex market; decision-makers need to know how your software will fulfill their business needs. In making the shift from documentation to marketing writing, it is necessary to broaden your sense of the writing’s purposes, and prepare for different ways of working with your material. However, many key aspects of the two specialities are the same, such as the need to uphold a consistent, well-defined tone and organization, and above all to strive for consistency and clarity.

Earle, Ralph. STC Proceedings (1996). Careers>TC>Marketing>Software

172.
#36729

Online Advertising And Its Impact On Web Design

Although advertising is a concern for website owners and those pushing products or services, it is also has an impact on Web designers, because they have to be able to design and develop websites that can produce ad revenue and still meet the needs of visitors. While advertisements are hardly the primary concern of Web designers in general, not accounting for them will result in a very awkward layout that can either detract from the flow of the website or put the ads in a spot where they will not receive enough attention from visitors. In order to maximize ad revenue for the client, with minimal interference in the appearance and usability of the website, the designer must take advertising needs into consideration throughout the design process.

Snell, Steven. Smashing (2008). Design>Web Design>Marketing>E Commerce

173.
#33406

Optimize Your AdWords Campaigns

Both AdWords and YSM are much more complicated beasts than the old banner networks ever were, and coming to grips with them can be a bit of a headache.

Oxer, Jonathan. Internet Vision Technologies (2008). Articles>Web Design>Marketing>Search Engine Optimization

174.
#31504

A Paradox in Shaping Corporate Reputation

Why are some companies regularly recognized as the nation’s most admired even when their across-the-board performance is inconsistent? Why are other companies that demonstrate solid, consistent performance often ignored? In two words, the answer is awareness and performance. Wal-Mart ranked at the top in a number of corporate reputation lists, yet the company was dogged by the discovery of undocumented workers in their stores. How does a company such as Wal-Mart succeed in light of such news?

Weiner, Mark. Communication World Bulletin (2004). Articles>Business Communication>Public Relations>Marketing

175.
#37506

Partnership: The Magic Ingredient for Affiliate Marketing

A successful affiliate marketing campaign will only happen - and remain long term - with successful relationships. Discover exactly what you need to do to build up these relationships.

Gurd, James. Webcredible (2010). Design>Web Design>Marketing

 
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