A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Interaction Design

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Interaction Design is a field and approach to designing interactive experiences. These could be in any medium, not only digital media. Interactive experiences, necessarily, require time as an organizing principle (though not exclusively) and Interactive Design is concerned with a user, customer, audience, or participant's experience flow through time. Interactivity should not be confused with animation in which objects may move on a screen; interactivity is concerned with being part of the action of a system or performance and not merely watching the action passively.

 

1.
#11798

Accommodating Color Blindness

An estimated nine to twelve percent of the male population suffers from some form of color vision deficiency, commonly called 'color blindness.' It is important for computer interface designers to take into account and eliminate, if possible, any potential confusions that can arise because of color vision deficiencies. There are two major types of color blindness. The most prevalent causes are confusion between red and green. This type affects approximately eight to ten percent of the male population. In another type, an additional one to two Percent of men suffer from a deficiency in perceiving blue/yellow differences. Less than one percent of women suffer from any form of color blindness. To understand color blindness better, it is helpful to be familiar with the ways in which colors differ from each other. One standard way to discuss color is to divide it into hue, saturation and brightness (HSB).

Hoffman, Paul. STC Usability SIG (1999). Design>Accessibility>Human Computer Interaction>Color

2.
#37186

An Adobe Flash Developer on Why the iPad Can’t Use Flash

I’m biased. I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for iPad. I want that to make sense—but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen.

Dilger, Daniel Eran. Roughly Drafter (2010). Articles>Web Design>Mobile>Interaction Design

3.
#18402

Affect and Machine Design: Lessons for the Development of Autonomous Machines   (PDF)

Human beings have evolved a rich and sophisticated set of processes for engaging with the world in which cognition and affect play two different but equally crucial roles. Cognition interprets and makes sense of the world. Affect evaluates and judges, modulating the operating parameters of cognition and giving a warning about possible dangers. The study of how these two systems work together provides guidance for the design of complex autonomous systems that must deal with a variety of tasks in a dynamic, often unpredictable, and sometimes hazardous environment.

Norman, Donald A., A. Ortony and D.M. Russell. JND.org (2003). Design>Human Computer Interaction>Web Design

4.
#27052

Ajax for Java developers: Build Dynamic Java Applications

The page-reload cycle presents one of the biggest usability obstacles in Web application development and is a serious challenge for Java™ developers. In this series, author Philip McCarthy introduces a groundbreaking approach to creating dynamic Web application experiences. Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a programming technique that lets you combine Java technologies, XML, and JavaScript for Java-based Web applications that break the page-reload paradigm.

McCarthy, Philip. IBM (2006). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

5.
#27745

The Ajax Transport Method

Discover three Ajax data transport mechanisms (XMLHttp, script tags, and frames or iframes) and their relative strengths and weaknesses. This tutorial provides code for both the server side and the client side and explains it in detail to provide the techniques you need to put efficient Ajax controls anywhere you need them.

Herrington, Jack D. IBM (2006). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

6.
#30224

AJAX: Highly Interactive Web Applications   (PDF)

AJAX stands for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. AJAX has recently been gaining attention as a way to make web applications more interactive. While it can reduce apparent latency between user interaction and application response, it can cause user interface, maintainability, and accessibility issues.

Giglio, Jason. Psychemorphic (2006). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

7.
#27621

Ajax: Usable Interactivity with Remote Scripting

This article aims to give you an introduction to the foundations of remote scripting, in particular, the emerging XMLHttpRequest protocol. We'll then walk through an example application that demonstrates how to implement that protocol, while creating a usable interface.

Adams, Cameron. SitePoint (2005). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

8.
#21338

Alan Cooper Speaks! Impressions from BayCHI April 2002

On the second Tuesday of every month, BayCHI, the Bay Area chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery's (ACM) special interest group on Computer-Human Interaction convenes. Brad Lauster shares his impressions of the discussion with Alan Cooper and the nature of Interaction Design.

Lauster, Brad. Boxes and Arrows (2002). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design

9.
#39115

An Interview with John Carroll

Interview with John Carroll, best‑known among technical communicators as “The Father of Minimalism,” a title he earned as a result of his popular book, The Nurnberg Funnel.

Bleiel, Nicky. Society for Technical Communication (2015). Articles>User Centered Design>Human Computer Interaction>Minimalism

10.
#35229

Applying Curiosity to Interaction Design: Tell Me Something I Don’t Know

Given just a bit of information, we naturally crave more. Given a puzzle, we have to solve it. So, as interaction designers, how are we using this bit of insight into human behavior?

Anderson, Stephen. Johnny Holland (2009). Articles>User Centered Design>Interaction Design>Cognitive Psychology

11.
#35232

Are We The Puppet Masters?

Through the designs we create, we have the ability to directly influence another person’s behavior. The ethical implications of this are important and not easily definable. I was interested in ethics before I ever considered becoming a designer, but the lessons I learned while studying philosophy impacts the way I view my designs. In nature, our goal is a good one. We strive to help others by improving the interactions that define their life. This drives us to create and innovate new ways of interacting with old concepts. The question remains, do we have the right to influence another person? Further, are there guiding principles we can follow that can keep us on the moral path? The answers to these questions rests on the shoulders of the whole community, not a single person or group.

Nunnally, Brad. Johnny Holland (2009). Articles>User Experience>Interaction Design>Rhetoric

12.
#21744

Asilomar Institute for Information Architecture

AIfIA is a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to advancing and promoting information architecture. Founded in 2002, AIfIA has over 400 members in 30 countries.

AIfIA. Organizations>Information Design>Human Computer Interaction

13.
#35276

Australasian CRC for Interaction Design (ACID)

ACID is the Australasian Cooperative Research Centre for Interaction Design. We find better ways for people to interact with each other using communication technologies. Our expertise lies in helping people participate in the digital world.

ACID. Organizations>User Centered Design>Interaction Design>Australia

14.
#22009

Barras de Mosaicos

Las barras de mosaico (TileBars) son una técnica de visualización de búsquedas en documentos que permiten hacerse una idea más clara de lo que nos devuelve un buscador, añadiendo la serendipia (descubrimiento accidental) al concepto de relevancia.

Dursteler, Juan Carlos. InfoVis (2002). (Spanish) Design>User Interface>Human Computer Interaction

15.
#29987

Beyond Software Manuals and On-line Help: Interactive Help

Software user guides have traditionally provided assistance when the user requested help. Context-sensitivity enabled help systems to predict the most appropriate topic to present. For Windows applications, the move from Microsoft WinHelp to the new Microsoft HTML Help format allows user instructions to be presented in the same window as the application. This offers technical authors some extraordinary opportunities to provide intelligent, predictive, interactive help without the user having to request it. In this paper, we will explore one of the first such interactive help systems (for the Archivist e-mail archiving software), and see where the technology is moving.

Self, Tony. HyperWrite (2003). Articles>Documentation>Interaction Design>Help

16.
#21727

Big Architect, Little Architect

First came the primordial soup. Thousands of relatively simple single-celled web sites appeared on the scene, and each one was quickly claimed by a multi-functional organism called a "webmaster." A symbiotic relationship quickly became apparent. Webmaster fed web site. Web site got bigger and more important. So did the role of the webmaster. Life was good. Then, bad things started to happen. The size and complexity and importance of the web sites began to spiral out of control. Mutations started cropping up. Strange new organisms with names like interaction designer, usability engineer, customer experience analyst, and information architect began competing with the webmaster and each other for responsibilities and rewards. Equilibrium had been punctuated and we entered the current era of rapid speciation and specialization.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Project Management

17.
#38958

Blueprint: Google Grid Gallery

This Blueprint is a responsive grid gallery based on the gallery by Google for the Chromebook Getting Started guide. In this Blueprint we use Masonry for the grid and 3D transforms for navigating the items. For smaller screens we have some example media queries that adjust the grid layout and also the gallery view. In the gallery view, the arrow keys can be used to navigate and the view can be closed using the “Esc” key.

Lou, Mary. Codrops (2014). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Graphic Design

18.
#38959

Blueprint: Responsive Full Width Tabs

A full width tab component with some example media queries for adjusting the icons of the tabs and the content layout. The main idea is to show only icons for the mobile view and allow the text to appear when there’s enough space. The content columns and the containing media boxes have three different layouts.

Lou, Mary. Codrops (2014). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Responsive

19.
#20775

Boxes and Arrows

Boxes and Arrows is the definitive source for the complex task of bringing architecture and design to the digital landscape. There are various titles and professions associated with this undertaking—information architecture, information design, interaction design, interface design—but when we looked at the work that we were actually doing, we found a “community of practice” with similarities in outlook and approach that far outweighed our differences. Boxes and Arrows is a peer-written journal dedicated to discussing, improving and promoting the work of this community, through the sharing of exemplary technique, innovation and informed opinion.

Boxes and Arrows. Journals>Web Design>User Centered Design>Interaction Design

20.
#38316

A Brief Rant on the Future of Interaction Design

With an entire body at your command, do you seriously think the Future Of Interaction should be a single finger?

Victor, Bret. WorryDream (2011). Articles>User Centered Design>Interaction Design

21.
#36693

Build a Creative "Swirl Animated Menu" with Flash CS4

Flash. It’s a powerful application and can be really complex, but even beginners can create a cool menu for demonstration or for use in a personal site. The menu that we will create is simple, but the swirl animation is something that you don’t see everywhere, for that I’ve decided to explain one way to make an animation of growing swirls without any Action Script code.You will also learn how to import artwork from illustrator where I’ve pre-made the graphics, the work is very simple and the result will be very cool.

Santos, Mario. Tech Labs, The (2009). Resources>Tutorials>Interaction Design>Flash

22.
#38579

Build Awesome Apps with CSS3 Animations

Today’s HTML5 applications can provide awesome experiences thanks to the new CSS3 specifications. One of them is CSS3 Animations. It can help you building rich animations on HTML elements. This can provide interesting feedbacks to the users and enables fast & fluid UIs. As those new animations are most of the time hardware accelerated by the GPU, they definitely raise the quality bar of the new generation of HTML5 applications.

Rousset, David. SitePoint (2012). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

23.
#37067

Building Web Services the REST Way

I will first provide a brief introduction to REST (Representational State Transfer) and then describe how to build Web services in the REST style.

Costello, Roger L. xFront (2006). Articles>Web Design>Information Design>Interaction Design

24.
#23967

Can Programmers Do Interaction Design?

In most of the organizations we encounter during our consulting work, programmers tend to think they’re the best-qualified people to design the form and behavior of a product. In the absence of trained interaction designers, they may be right. They know from experience that no one else is going to think through all the implications of serving up that snippet of data in just the right way, and no one else questions the idea of programmers doing the interaction design because they assume it’s a technology problem. As a result, executives who lead technology initiatives believe that they already get interaction design for free from their programmers. In their opinion, having interaction designers is unnecessary; if the product happens to be hard to use, they assume the programmers just need some sensitivity training. Having programmers design the product is anything but free, though; it's ineffective, inefficient, and risky.

Goodwin, Kim. Cooper Interaction Design (2003). Design>User Interface>Interaction Design

25.
#30012

Canonical Abstract Prototypes for Abstract Visual and Interaction Design   (PDF)

Abstract user interface prototypes offer designers a form of representation for specification and exploration of visual and interaction design ideas that is intermediate between abstract task models and realistic or representational prototypes. Canonical Abstract Prototypes are an extension to usage-centered design that provides a formal vocabulary for expressing visual and interaction designs without concern for details of appearance and behavior. A standardized abstract design vocabulary facilitates comparison of designs, eases recognition and simplifies description of common design patterns, and lays the foundations for better software tools. This paper covers recent refinements in the modeling notation and the set of Canonical Abstract Components. New applications of abstract prototypes to design patterns are discussed, and variations in software tools support are outlined.

Constantine, Larry L. Constantine and Lockwood (2003). Articles>User Interface>Interaction Design>Visual Rhetoric

 
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