A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

FAQ

8 found.

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1.
#33336

FAQs: Do Better Solutions Exist?

Documentation sometimes contains a section titled, 'Frequently asked questions' or 'FAQs'. The TechScribe website used to have a page of FAQs, but better options exist, and therefore, we removed the FAQs.

Unwalla, Mike. TechScribe (2007). Articles>Documentation>Online>FAQ

2.
#10134

Hypertext   (peer-reviewed)

Linked presentation as we know it today -- a navigation menu, a table of contents, a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) -- suits informational material such as technical manuals, government documents, and most scientific research papers. These presentation formats do little to enhance narrative forms, however. Most discussion of online narrative -- and most experimentation -- has centered on fiction (Coover, 1993, 2000; Minganti, 1996) and literary studies (Landow, 1992; Lavagnino, 1997). Journalism narratives, especially long-form journalism, are overdue for attention.

McAdams, Mindy and Stephanie Berger. Journal of Electronic Publishing (2001). Articles>Publishing>Hypertext>FAQ

3.
#22792

Just the FAQs   (PDF)

Offers advice on creating effective FAQ documents.

Hart, Geoffrey J.S. Intercom (2004). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>FAQ

4.
#30810

Nine Tips for Writing Better FAQs

Frequently asked questions, or FAQs, are an important part of your product documentation. Writing well-targeted and thorough FAQs allow users to quickly find the answers they need so they can be more productive when using your product. Here are some tips for writing FAQs that will get your users on track quickly and help reduce Customer Support calls.

HelpScribe (2008). Articles>Documentation>Writing>FAQ

5.
#36815

Six Tips for a Killer FAQ Page

A FAQ (“Frequently Asked Questions” document) can be one of the best investments a project makes in terms of educational payoff. FAQs are highly tuned to the questions users and developers actually ask—as opposed to the questions you might have expected them to ask—and therefore, a well-maintained FAQ tends to give those who consult it exactly what they’re looking for. The FAQ is often the first place users look when they encounter a problem, often even in preference to the official manual, and it’s probably the document in your project most likely to be linked to from other sites.

Feedback Army (2009). Articles>Documentation>Online>FAQ

6.
#13211

Technical Communications and Customer Support: Partnering to Publish What Customers Want to Know   (PDF)

Most customers do not provide direct feedback on product documentation. Instead, when documentation fails to provide the information that a customer needs to use a tool effectively, he or she calls Customer Support for advice. To find out what information was missing or incorrect in our product documentation, I analyzed the Cadence Customer Support call logs that pertained to my products to find out what questions customers ask most about each product. I then partnered with teams of applications engineers (AEs) to improve our documentation by answering common questions, both on the Web in FAQ documents and in product manuals.

Guglielmetti, Krista. STC Proceedings (2000). Presentations>Documentation>Assessment>FAQ

7.
#36803

Why FAQs Are the Tech Writer's Secret Weapon

Most questions have been asked before. This isn’t a profound statement; most of us would consider it obvious. Just ask anyone on your Product Support team. Chances are the majority of calls they receive are fielded with canned answers. Why? Because we all seem to ask the same questions. By providing answers to those questions, you can help the majority of your users get back on track quickly.

Haiss, Craig. Communications from DMN (2009). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>FAQ

8.
#34520

Why FAQs are the Tech Writer’s Secret Weapon

Most questions have been asked before. This isn’t a profound statement; most of us would consider it obvious. Just ask anyone on your Product Support team. Chances are the majority of calls they receive are fielded with canned answers. Why? Because we all seem to ask the same questions. By providing answers to those questions, you can help the majority of your users get back on track quickly.

Haiss, Craig. DMN Communications (2009). Articles>Writing>Technical Writing>FAQ

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