A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Design>Web Design>Interaction Design

121 found. Page 1 of 5.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

1 2 3 4 5  NEXT PAGE »

 

1.
#37186

An Adobe Flash Developer on Why the iPad Can’t Use Flash

I’m biased. I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for iPad. I want that to make sense—but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen.

Dilger, Daniel Eran. Roughly Drafter (2010). Articles>Web Design>Mobile>Interaction Design

2.
#18402

Affect and Machine Design: Lessons for the Development of Autonomous Machines   (PDF)

Human beings have evolved a rich and sophisticated set of processes for engaging with the world in which cognition and affect play two different but equally crucial roles. Cognition interprets and makes sense of the world. Affect evaluates and judges, modulating the operating parameters of cognition and giving a warning about possible dangers. The study of how these two systems work together provides guidance for the design of complex autonomous systems that must deal with a variety of tasks in a dynamic, often unpredictable, and sometimes hazardous environment.

Norman, Donald A., A. Ortony and D.M. Russell. JND.org (2003). Design>Human Computer Interaction>Web Design

3.
#27052

Ajax for Java developers: Build Dynamic Java Applications

The page-reload cycle presents one of the biggest usability obstacles in Web application development and is a serious challenge for Java™ developers. In this series, author Philip McCarthy introduces a groundbreaking approach to creating dynamic Web application experiences. Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a programming technique that lets you combine Java technologies, XML, and JavaScript for Java-based Web applications that break the page-reload paradigm.

McCarthy, Philip. IBM (2006). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

4.
#27745

The Ajax Transport Method

Discover three Ajax data transport mechanisms (XMLHttp, script tags, and frames or iframes) and their relative strengths and weaknesses. This tutorial provides code for both the server side and the client side and explains it in detail to provide the techniques you need to put efficient Ajax controls anywhere you need them.

Herrington, Jack D. IBM (2006). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

5.
#30224

AJAX: Highly Interactive Web Applications   (PDF)

AJAX stands for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. AJAX has recently been gaining attention as a way to make web applications more interactive. While it can reduce apparent latency between user interaction and application response, it can cause user interface, maintainability, and accessibility issues.

Giglio, Jason. Psychemorphic (2006). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

6.
#27621

Ajax: Usable Interactivity with Remote Scripting

This article aims to give you an introduction to the foundations of remote scripting, in particular, the emerging XMLHttpRequest protocol. We'll then walk through an example application that demonstrates how to implement that protocol, while creating a usable interface.

Adams, Cameron. SitePoint (2005). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

7.
#21338

Alan Cooper Speaks! Impressions from BayCHI April 2002

On the second Tuesday of every month, BayCHI, the Bay Area chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery's (ACM) special interest group on Computer-Human Interaction convenes. Brad Lauster shares his impressions of the discussion with Alan Cooper and the nature of Interaction Design.

Lauster, Brad. Boxes and Arrows (2002). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design

8.
#21727

Big Architect, Little Architect

First came the primordial soup. Thousands of relatively simple single-celled web sites appeared on the scene, and each one was quickly claimed by a multi-functional organism called a "webmaster." A symbiotic relationship quickly became apparent. Webmaster fed web site. Web site got bigger and more important. So did the role of the webmaster. Life was good. Then, bad things started to happen. The size and complexity and importance of the web sites began to spiral out of control. Mutations started cropping up. Strange new organisms with names like interaction designer, usability engineer, customer experience analyst, and information architect began competing with the webmaster and each other for responsibilities and rewards. Equilibrium had been punctuated and we entered the current era of rapid speciation and specialization.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Project Management

9.
#38958

Blueprint: Google Grid Gallery

This Blueprint is a responsive grid gallery based on the gallery by Google for the Chromebook Getting Started guide. In this Blueprint we use Masonry for the grid and 3D transforms for navigating the items. For smaller screens we have some example media queries that adjust the grid layout and also the gallery view. In the gallery view, the arrow keys can be used to navigate and the view can be closed using the “Esc” key.

Lou, Mary. Codrops (2014). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Graphic Design

10.
#38959

Blueprint: Responsive Full Width Tabs

A full width tab component with some example media queries for adjusting the icons of the tabs and the content layout. The main idea is to show only icons for the mobile view and allow the text to appear when there’s enough space. The content columns and the containing media boxes have three different layouts.

Lou, Mary. Codrops (2014). Design>Web Design>Interaction Design>Responsive

11.
#20775

Boxes and Arrows

Boxes and Arrows is the definitive source for the complex task of bringing architecture and design to the digital landscape. There are various titles and professions associated with this undertaking—information architecture, information design, interaction design, interface design—but when we looked at the work that we were actually doing, we found a “community of practice” with similarities in outlook and approach that far outweighed our differences. Boxes and Arrows is a peer-written journal dedicated to discussing, improving and promoting the work of this community, through the sharing of exemplary technique, innovation and informed opinion.

Boxes and Arrows. Journals>Web Design>User Centered Design>Interaction Design

12.
#38579

Build Awesome Apps with CSS3 Animations

Today’s HTML5 applications can provide awesome experiences thanks to the new CSS3 specifications. One of them is CSS3 Animations. It can help you building rich animations on HTML elements. This can provide interesting feedbacks to the users and enables fast & fluid UIs. As those new animations are most of the time hardware accelerated by the GPU, they definitely raise the quality bar of the new generation of HTML5 applications.

Rousset, David. SitePoint (2012). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

13.
#37067

Building Web Services the REST Way

I will first provide a brief introduction to REST (Representational State Transfer) and then describe how to build Web services in the REST style.

Costello, Roger L. xFront (2006). Articles>Web Design>Information Design>Interaction Design

14.
#38305

Case Study: Getting Hardboiled with CSS3 2D Transforms

In this example we’ll use CSS3 two-dimensional transforms to add realism to a row of hardboiled private detectives’ business cards.

Clarke, Andy. Typekit Blog (2011). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>CSS

15.
#37040

Case Study: National Park Foundation Micro Site

Modernista! teamed up with FL2 to design and develop a micro site for the National Park Foundation that coincided with Modernista!’s broadcast campaign supporting the Ken Burns PBS documentary The National Parks: America’s Best Idea. The site provides a destination for users to explore the National Parks, make a personal contribution, and most importantly share it with others—reinforcing the sense of collective ownership, pride and responsibility of our National Parks System.

Brady, Tracy and Matt FaJohn. AIGA (2009). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Case Studies

16.
#35858

Content Overlay with CSS

Here's the problem: you have a container with some content in it like an image along with some initial descriptive text. Then, when users hover their mouse over the container, a hidden container is revealed to present additional information over top of the current information but in a way that retains content from the original container.

Snook, Jonathan. Snook.ca (2008). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

17.
#21612

El Control de la Interacción

La interacción en un elemento clave en la adquisición de conocimiento. Depende básicamente de dos factores: tiempo y control. En el artículo anterior hablamos del primero. En éste consideramos la importancia del control y las técnicas para llevarlo a cabo.

Dursteler, Juan Carlos. InfoVis (2003). (Spanish) Design>Web Design>Interaction Design

18.
#32598

Creating Modular Interactive User Interfaces with JavaScript

Discover a technique that lets you move sections of a Web page using drag-and-drop functions. Different aspects of the interactivity are implemented separately and then composed into a unified whole, allowing for flexible customization that can make your Web users very happy.

Travis, Greg. IBM (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>JavaScript

19.
#38100

CSS Attribute Selectors: How and Why You Should Be Using Them

Today we’re going to learn about Attribute Selectors. What are they? How do I use them? What are the new CSS3 Attribute selectors? We’ll answer these questions and more.

Johnson, Joshua. Design Shack (2011). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

20.
#36889

CSS Sprites: Useful Technique, or Potential Nuisance?

Ah, the ubiquitous CSS sprites — one of the few web design techniques that was able to bypass “trend” status almost instantly, planting itself firmly into the category of best practice CSS. In this article, I’m going to discuss some of the pros and cons of using CSS sprites, focusing particularly on the use of “mega” sprites, and why such use of sprites could in many cases be a waste of time.

Lazaris, Louis. Smashing (2010). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>CSS

21.
#23075

Depth vs Breadth in the Arrangement of Web Links

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of depth and breadth of web site structure on the user response time.

Mtei, Lianaeli and Panayiotis Zaphiris. SHORE (1997). Design>Web Design>Human Computer Interaction>Usability

22.
#38365

The Design and Display of Simple Interactions on Mobile Devices

Users visit mobile sites not only to consume content, but to get things done. Let’s take air travel as an example: tasks that users often find themselves performing on an airline company’s mobile site include checking flight status, checking in for a particular flight, and searching for and booking a flight. How does mobile user interface design support task completion? What are the optimal ways of communicating and displaying interactions on mobile sites? With the aim of discovering optimal ways of designing simple interactions on mobile devices, I examined the task of checking flight status. I’m hoping that my analysis sheds some light on this topic.

Ma, Shanshan. UXmatters (2011). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Mobile

23.
#32648

Design Decisions vs. Audience Considerations

Deep down below the layers of interface, CSS, HTML, and XML—down where only the geekiest among us roam—everything comes down to this: it’s all zeroes and ones. On or off. The digital switch Though interaction and conversion becomes a bit more complicated at the point the interface meets the visitor, though there are a few more shades of gray, in the end it comes down to the same thing: yes or no.

Ragle-Davis, Robin. Digital Web Magazine (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Audience Analysis

24.
#30013

Devilish Details: Best Practices in Web Design   (PDF)

Visual and interaction design for successful e-commerce Web sites and Web-based applications requires meticulous attention to detail. Because the smallest matters can ruin the user experience, an orderly process--such as usage-centered design--guided by robust principles is needed; iterative testing and repetitive redesign is inadequate to find and address all the diverse matters needing attention. This paper reviews basic principles and then surveys best practices in the detailed aspects of Web design in three broad areas: details of architecture or organization, details of interaction design, and details relating to commercial activity, especially shopping. Specific recommendations in each area are offered as examples of best practices based on usage-centered principles.

Constantine, Larry L. Constantine and Lockwood (2003). Design>Web Design>Information Design>Interaction Design

25.
#32467

The Dilemma of Comments

Abuse has made me seriously consider – several times – disabling comments. I’m ambivalent about it. On the one hand it would make writing and publishing much easier. Write something, proofread it, publish.

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2007). Articles>Web Design>Community Building>Interaction Design

 
 NEXT PAGE »

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon