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Design>User Experience>Mobile

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1.
#38526

Five Ways to Create Better iPad Applications

We've just passed the two-year mark of the iPad being on the market. And with a second milestone of 200,000 iPad applications on the App Store nearing, there's no better time than now to reassess how to approach the UX of iPad applications.Some of the ideas in this article are relevant to all tablets, not just the iPad. But in consideration of the tremendous success of the iPad (73% of all tablet sales last year), it does warrant specific attention and focus. So, without further ado, here are five interface guidelines to (re)consider when approaching the UX and design of iPad applications.

Yarmoush, Ken. UX Magazine (2012). Design>User Interface>User Experience>Mobile

2.
#30187

Where Are You Now? Design for the Location Revolution

Experience designers need to transition from designing for a single, static space--the desktop--to imagining the broad possibilities of the geospatial Web. For digital products and services, the next dimension of user experience we should consider during design is location.

Follett, Jonathan. UXmatters (2007). Design>User Experience>Mobile

3.
#38141

Why Mobile UX is More Than “Users On-The-Go”

It’s a common misconception that UX for mobile is all about creating something for users on-the-go—users with little time, checking in on their mobile on the train or at the bus stop waiting for a bus. But today’s mobile user is so much more than that, with the rise in tablet usage further contributing to the growth and variety of their needs. No longer can UX practitioners expect to satisfy the mobile user with added pinch-and-zoom functionality or bigger call-to-action buttons; these things are expected, and don’t improve UX.

Hampton, Laura. UX Magazine (2011). Articles>Web Design>User Experience>Mobile

4.
#39077

Design for Fingers and Thumbs Instead of Touch

Until recently, Josh Clark’s charts of thumb-sweep ranges represented the state of the art in understanding touch interactions. In creating his charts, Josh surmised that elements at the top of the screen—and especially those on the opposite side from the thumb, or in the upper-left corner for right-handers—were hard to reach, and thus, designers should place only rare or dangerous actions in that location. Since then, we’ve seen that people stretch and shift their grip to reach targets anywhere on the screen, without apparent complaint. The iPhone’s Back button doesn’t appear to present any particular hardship to users. So the assumption behind those charts seems to be wrong—at least in the theory behind it. But are there other critical constraints at work? I am starting to think that it’s time for us to start designing for fingers and thumbs instead of for touch.

Hoober, Steven. UXmatters (2013). Articles>Web Design>User Experience>Mobile

5.
#39092

Do Androids Dream in Free Verse?

From ATMs to Siri to the button text in an application user interface, we “talk” to our tech—and our tech talks back. Often this exchange is purely transactional, but newer technologies have renegotiated this relationship. Joscelin Cooper reflects on how we can design successful human-machine conversations that are neither cloying nor overly mechanical.

Cooper, Joscelin. List Apart, A (2015). Articles>User Experience>Web Design>Mobile

6.
#39110

What Does it Take to be a Mobile Designer Today?

Mobile is here to stay, with its own set of rules and constraints. At the same time, it’s a rapidly evolving platform, with new technologies and capabilities being added by the quarter. We can’t design for mobile like we used to do for posters and Web pages. So what toolkit and mindset does a mobile designer need to thrive?

Nouvel, Sergio. UX Magazine (2014). Articles>Web Design>Mobile>User Experience

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