A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

DITA

176-192 of 192 found. Page 8 of 8.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

« PREVIOUS PAGE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is an XML-based architecture for authoring, producing, and delivering technical information. DITA divides content into small, self-contained topics that can be reused in different deliverables. The extensibility of DITA permits organizations to define specific information structures and still use standard tools to work with them. DITA is often compared against DocBook, a similar XML schema.

 

176.
#28773

What Managers Need to Know About DITA   (PDF)

Product documentation is expensive--often, much more expensive than it needs to be. With DITA promising savings of 50% in product documentation preparation costs, and 80% in translation costs, managers need to know what DITA is and if it can work for their organization. This white paper distills the information that managers need to know about DITA.

Reichman, Katriel. Method M (2007). Articles>Documentation>Standards>DITA

177.
#29461

The What, Why, How, and Where of DITA   (PDF)

Is DITA right for your organization? This article provides a starting point for your own research on DITA.

Steiner, Rob. Intercom (2007). Articles>Information Design>XML>DITA

178.
#33682

Where I Stand on the Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA)

DITA provides the ability to chunk information, to deliver selected topics in a variety of compilations and output to various formats. It allows the passing back and forth of this content among authors regardless of tools. My hesitation with DITA has only been that it’s too early to adopt. But I believe the turning point has come.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2009). Articles>Information Design>XML>DITA

179.
#38978

Why Developers Will Never Adopt DITA

DITA allows you to re-use text, apply attributes, and process your content into more than just HTML. But if you’re just publishing to the web, and you don’t have a lot of complex re-use requirements, isn’t it just extra work adding all of these DITA tags?

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2014). Articles>Documentation>XML>DITA

180.
#32368

Why Use DITA to Produce HTML Deliverables?

The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is an XML-based format for structuring and authoring technical content. This article explores advantages DITA provides for producing HTML content -- including easy global changes, portability through standards, superior linking and Web management, conditional processing, content and design reuse, and better writing through focused content. DITA consolidates all of the benefits in a consistent, overall information architecture that can evolve and grow along with your product information needs and delivery modes, and with the evolution of standard tools for delivering XML as the presentation mechanism.

Hunt, John, Don Day, Erik Hennum, Michael Priestley and Dave Schell. IBM (2005). Articles>Information Design>HTML>DITA

181.
#39221

Why You Need the Advanced DITA Workshop

If you’ve been looking for a job lately, you’ve probably noticed many employers are requiring experience in DITA and topic-based authoring. Being a technical writer without knowledge of DITA is like being a wallflower at the dance. Don’t wilt on the sidelines and watch your colleagues pass you in the fast lane to higher paying jobs.

Logan, Lisa. Carolina Communique (2016). Articles>Technology>DITA>Technical Writing

182.
#30229

Wikis, Docs, and the Reuse Proposition

The Darwin Informaton Typing Architecture (DITA) is an XML-based document format that was designed from the ground up for reuse. It rocks. Content Managment Systms (CMSes) are designed to hold XML data. So in theory, a CMS system that lets you edit like a Wiki would be everything you need. But getting a system like that to work is a pretty tricky proposition.

Armstrong, Eric. Sun Microsystems (2007). Articles>Content Management>XML>DITA

183.
#37152

Will Cloud Computing Change DITA Content Management?

Will users one day see a cafeteria buffet of choices for CM solutions on the cloud? Will the partnership of SharePoint, Content Technologies and Schema Logic drive CCM out of the tech docs group and into the central IT department or the cloud? Will this allow the principles of intelligent content design and component content management to move beyond tech docs and into other areas of business communications?

Emerson, Glenn. G. Emerson Consulting (2010). Articles>Content Management>DITA>Cloud Computing

184.
#38962

Woes of Conditional Text and Topichead Elements (DITA Best Practices)

When authoring in DITA, there are a couple of best (or worst) practices that I wasn’t aware of. The first is with conditional text; the second is with topichead elements.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2014). Articles>Information Design>XML>DITA

185.
#37151

Writing in DITA: Tip 3

While authoring, I often need to refer to that specific directory, that particular URL, this specific file which resides in this specific directory. As the software development cycle progresses, names change (and how). By the time people are ready for bit freeze, I am out of my mind worrying if all the specific references I put in your doc are updated (specific references are more "consumable" by a user). But if I've had the time to plan, I'd have probably envisaged such a scenario and prepared myself. How?

Basu, Anindita. Writing Technically (2010). Articles>Information Design>XML>DITA

186.
#36219

Writing My First DITA-Ready Topic

Using DITA actually makes your procedures concise and useful. You no longer have to worry about what fits and what doesn’t. Breaking your procedures into the various DITA elements helps you see whether certain information needs to be added, moved, or deleted. And then suddenly, when you begin to write procedures, you automatically start adding, deleting, and moving information around like you need to do with DITA. Before you know it, DITA has already changed the way your procedures look. So how do you get started?

Sequeira, Anne. Indus (2009). Articles>Information Design>XML>DITA

187.
#37511

XMetaL and DITA in the Marketing Department: Tastes Great, Less Filling

FO sprites are your friend. XSL:FO does not support background images on the page level. use CSS sprites technique on page regions.

Johnson, Chris. Slideshare (2010). Presentations>Information Design>XML>DITA

188.
#29458

XMetaL-DITA

The XMetaL-DITA group was founded to educate XMetaL users in working with the DITA standard.

Yahoo. Organizations>Information Design>XML>DITA

189.
#27640

An XML Architecture for Technical Documentation: The Darwin Information Typing Architecture

DITA is an architecture for creating topic-oriented, information-typed content that can be reused and single-sourced in a variety of ways. It is also an architecture for creating new information types and describing new information domains, allowing groups to create very specific, targeted document type definitions using a process called specialization, while at the same time reusing common output transforms and design rules. We discuss several methods that can be used to extend DITA's basic topic types.

Day, Don, Erik Hennum, John Hunt, Michael Priestley, David Schell and Nancy Harrison. WritersUA (2004). Articles>Documentation>XML>DITA

190.
#33730

An XML Architecture for Technical Documentation: The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA)

DITA is an architecture for creating topic-oriented, information-typed content that can be reused and single-sourced in a variety of ways. It is also an architecture for creating new information types and describing new information domains, allowing groups to create very specific, targeted document type definitions using a process called specialization, while at the same time reusing common output transforms and design rules. We discuss several methods that can be used to extend DITA's basic topic types.

Day, Don, Erik Hennum, John Hunt, Michael Priestley, David Schell and Nancy Harrison. WritersUA (2004). Articles>Documentation>XML>DITA

191.
#35619

XMLmind DITA Converter

XMLmind DITA Converter (ditac for short) allows to convert the most complex DITA 1.1 documents to production-quality XHTML 1.0, XHTML 1.1, HTML 4.1, JavaTM Help, HTML Help, Eclipse Help, PDF, PostScript®, RTF (can be opened in Word 2000+), WordprocessingML (can be opened in Word 2003+), Office Open XML (.docx, can be opened in Word 2007+), OpenOffice (.odt, can be opened in OpenOffice.org 2+).

XMLmind (2009). Resources>Software>DITA>Open Source

192.
#34275

The Xquery Language and the DITA Open Toolkit

Xquery is a powerful query language designed specifically for XML content. It can be used for querying, processing, manipulation, and transformation of xml content. This presentation demonstrates how Xquery can be used to add to the feature set of the Dita Open Toolkit by introducing automatic glossary processing.

XML.org (2009). Presentations>Information Design>XSL>DITA

 
« PREVIOUS PAGE 

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon