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1.
#37186

An Adobe Flash Developer on Why the iPad Can’t Use Flash

I’m biased. I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for iPad. I want that to make sense—but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen.

Dilger, Daniel Eran. Roughly Drafter (2010). Articles>Web Design>Mobile>Interaction Design

2.
#27052

Ajax for Java developers: Build Dynamic Java Applications

The page-reload cycle presents one of the biggest usability obstacles in Web application development and is a serious challenge for Java™ developers. In this series, author Philip McCarthy introduces a groundbreaking approach to creating dynamic Web application experiences. Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a programming technique that lets you combine Java technologies, XML, and JavaScript for Java-based Web applications that break the page-reload paradigm.

McCarthy, Philip. IBM (2006). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

3.
#37692

Art Direction and Design  (link broken)

Glorifying the supposed arrival of art direction on the web is one of the latest trends in interactive design. There are several galleries devoted to it. There’s even a plug-in for it. Sadly, many designers don’t understand the difference between design and art direction; sadder still, many art directors don’t either: Art direction gives substance to design. Art direction adds humanity to design.

Mall, Dan. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Project Management

4.
#21727

Big Architect, Little Architect

First came the primordial soup. Thousands of relatively simple single-celled web sites appeared on the scene, and each one was quickly claimed by a multi-functional organism called a "webmaster." A symbiotic relationship quickly became apparent. Webmaster fed web site. Web site got bigger and more important. So did the role of the webmaster. Life was good. Then, bad things started to happen. The size and complexity and importance of the web sites began to spiral out of control. Mutations started cropping up. Strange new organisms with names like interaction designer, usability engineer, customer experience analyst, and information architect began competing with the webmaster and each other for responsibilities and rewards. Equilibrium had been punctuated and we entered the current era of rapid speciation and specialization.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Project Management

5.
#38579

Build Awesome Apps with CSS3 Animations

Today’s HTML5 applications can provide awesome experiences thanks to the new CSS3 specifications. One of them is CSS3 Animations. It can help you building rich animations on HTML elements. This can provide interesting feedbacks to the users and enables fast & fluid UIs. As those new animations are most of the time hardware accelerated by the GPU, they definitely raise the quality bar of the new generation of HTML5 applications.

Rousset, David. SitePoint (2012). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

6.
#37067

Building Web Services the REST Way

I will first provide a brief introduction to REST (Representational State Transfer) and then describe how to build Web services in the REST style.

Costello, Roger L. xFront (2006). Articles>Web Design>Information Design>Interaction Design

7.
#38305

Case Study: Getting Hardboiled with CSS3 2D Transforms

In this example we’ll use CSS3 two-dimensional transforms to add realism to a row of hardboiled private detectives’ business cards.

Clarke, Andy. Typekit Blog (2011). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>CSS

8.
#37040

Case Study: National Park Foundation Micro Site

Modernista! teamed up with FL2 to design and develop a micro site for the National Park Foundation that coincided with Modernista!’s broadcast campaign supporting the Ken Burns PBS documentary The National Parks: America’s Best Idea. The site provides a destination for users to explore the National Parks, make a personal contribution, and most importantly share it with others—reinforcing the sense of collective ownership, pride and responsibility of our National Parks System.

Brady, Tracy and Matt FaJohn. AIGA (2009). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Case Studies

9.
#35858

Content Overlay with CSS

Here's the problem: you have a container with some content in it like an image along with some initial descriptive text. Then, when users hover their mouse over the container, a hidden container is revealed to present additional information over top of the current information but in a way that retains content from the original container.

Snook, Jonathan. Snook.ca (2008). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

10.
#32598

Creating Modular Interactive User Interfaces with JavaScript

Discover a technique that lets you move sections of a Web page using drag-and-drop functions. Different aspects of the interactivity are implemented separately and then composed into a unified whole, allowing for flexible customization that can make your Web users very happy.

Travis, Greg. IBM (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>JavaScript

11.
#38100

CSS Attribute Selectors: How and Why You Should Be Using Them

Today we’re going to learn about Attribute Selectors. What are they? How do I use them? What are the new CSS3 Attribute selectors? We’ll answer these questions and more.

Johnson, Joshua. Design Shack (2011). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

12.
#36889

CSS Sprites: Useful Technique, or Potential Nuisance?

Ah, the ubiquitous CSS sprites — one of the few web design techniques that was able to bypass “trend” status almost instantly, planting itself firmly into the category of best practice CSS. In this article, I’m going to discuss some of the pros and cons of using CSS sprites, focusing particularly on the use of “mega” sprites, and why such use of sprites could in many cases be a waste of time.

Lazaris, Louis. Smashing (2010). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>CSS

13.
#38365

The Design and Display of Simple Interactions on Mobile Devices

Users visit mobile sites not only to consume content, but to get things done. Let’s take air travel as an example: tasks that users often find themselves performing on an airline company’s mobile site include checking flight status, checking in for a particular flight, and searching for and booking a flight. How does mobile user interface design support task completion? What are the optimal ways of communicating and displaying interactions on mobile sites? With the aim of discovering optimal ways of designing simple interactions on mobile devices, I examined the task of checking flight status. I’m hoping that my analysis sheds some light on this topic.

Ma, Shanshan. UXmatters (2011). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Mobile

14.
#32648

Design Decisions vs. Audience Considerations

Deep down below the layers of interface, CSS, HTML, and XML—down where only the geekiest among us roam—everything comes down to this: it’s all zeroes and ones. On or off. The digital switch Though interaction and conversion becomes a bit more complicated at the point the interface meets the visitor, though there are a few more shades of gray, in the end it comes down to the same thing: yes or no.

Ragle-Davis, Robin. Digital Web Magazine (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Audience Analysis

15.
#32467

The Dilemma of Comments

Abuse has made me seriously consider – several times – disabling comments. I’m ambivalent about it. On the one hand it would make writing and publishing much easier. Write something, proofread it, publish.

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2007). Articles>Web Design>Community Building>Interaction Design

16.
#32968

The Document Triangle

Every paper and digital document shares three basic dimensions: structure, information and presentation. Although these dimensions are always interwoven, some people in the digital world mostly focus on document structures (e.g. information architects), some on the information they contain (e.g. marketers and writers/editors) while others specialise in the (interactive) presentation aspects (e.g. visual designers and Flash developers). The mutual dependence and interaction of these dimensions is the next level of design and does not regularly get the proper attention. In order to better understand the relationship between these dimensions, we need to look at each of them seperately, and how they inter-relate.

Bogaards, Peter J. BogieLand (2003). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design

17.
#29982

Editable HTML Content

One of the little known features of DHTML, at least within Internet Explorer 5.5 or above, is an attribute known as contentEditable. This attribute can be used to make areas of text within a Web page editable by the user. This is very different from a form element, such as a text box, as contentEditable can make a table cell, or a standard paragraph editable.

HyperWrite (2005). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>DHTML

18.
#10168

The End of Web Design

Websites must tone down their individual appearance and distinct design in all ways: visual design; terminology and labeling; interaction design and workflow; and information architecture. These changes are driven by four different trends that all lead to the same conclusion.

Nielsen, Jakob. Alertbox (2000). Articles>Usability>Web Design>Interaction Design

19.
#37835

The Essence of Interaction Design—Part I: Designing Virtual Contexts for Interaction

With this column, I’m introducing a multipart series on what I consider to be the essence of interaction design for application user experiences. First, I’ll lay the groundwork for this series by describing the role of interaction design, then I’ll embark on my exploration of the essence of interaction design by discussing the design of virtual contexts for interaction.

Gabriel-Petit, Pabini. UXmatters (2011). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design

20.
#37694

Forward Thinking Form Validation

Form validation has been a finicky business since the web was born. First came the server-side validation error summary. Then we evolved to client-side validation to verify results inline. Now, we have the marching giant that is HTML5 and CSS3: HTML5’s forms chapter offers new input types and attributes that make validation constraints possible. CSS3’s basic UI module provides several pseudo-classes to help us style those validation states and change a field’s appearance based on the user’s actions. Let’s take a look at combining the two to create a CSS-based form validator that has fairly broad browser support.

Seddon, Ryan. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Forms>Interaction Design

21.
#32392

Generating Automatic Website Footnotes with jQuery

Generating footnotes for HTML documents in the past was always a slow, painful task — and every time I did it, I wondered why there wasn’t a better, easier way. Today, I’m happy to announce that I’ve come up with a better solution to web footnotes using the jQuery JavaScript framework and a few tags and attributes that already exist in XHTML.

Glazebrook, Rob L. CSSnewbie (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

22.
#32673

Image Fade Revisited

This episode is revisiting the image cross fade effect, in particular Dragon Interactive has a beautiful little transition for their navigation that some readers have been requesting. Greg Johnson takes it one step further to implement this method using jQuery and the methods shown here.

Sharp, Remy. jQuery for Designers (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Ajax

23.
#26778

Interaction Modeling: User State-Trace Analysis

Interaction modeling is a good way to identify and locate usability issues with the use of a tool. Several methods exist. Modeling techniques are prescriptive in that they aim to capture what users will likely do, and not descriptive of what users actually did.

Queen, Matt. Boxes and Arrows (2006). Articles>Web Design>Usability>Interaction Design

24.
#35763

Intro to jQuery 2

Starting off where we left off last time, we continue exploring the possibilities of jQuery. We revisit some of the old functions and make them do some smarter things. We explore a simple variable and an IF/ELSE statement. Then we look at the AJAX-y .load() function, the CSS function, and then finish off by writing out own custom function and going over how that layer of abstraction can help us keep our code clean. Semantics counts in JavaScript too!

Coyier, Chris. CSS Tricks (2008). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Screencasts

25.
#38580

Introduction to CSS3 Transitions

A good-looking application must provide user with visual feedback. User must always know that an order (a click, a tap or whatever) is well received and understood by the application and animations are a great tool to do so. The new HTML 5 specification (to be honest, I should say “the new CSS 3 specification”) introduces a great tool to handle simple animations: the transitions.

Catuhe, David. Eternal Coding (2011). Articles>Web Design>CSS>Interaction Design

 
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