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1.
#27724

ABBR and ACRONYM are for User Agents, Not for End Users

The WCAG (1.0) guideline 4, checkpoint 4.2, about ABBR and ACRONYM, has for a long time been too unclear to implement. The drafts for XHTML 2.0 and WCAG 2.0 seem to have solved most problems.

Tverskov, Jesper. Smack the Mouse (2004). Articles>Web Design>HTML

2.
#35196

Adventures in Web 3.0: Part 1 - HTML 5

With HTML5 markup in place I started wondering about how CSS would affect things. The first thing I discovered was that Firefox doesn't have much in the way of default styling for the new elements - so setting background colours doesn't have much effect until I added some default styles.

Crowther, Rob. Boog Design (2009). Articles>Web Design>HTML>HTML5

3.
#35197

Adventures in Web 3.0: Part 2 - CSS 3

Unlike its predecessors, CSS3 is not a single, monolithic spec, but a collection of modules all of which are at different levels of completeness. For instance the selectors module became a candidate recommendation in November 2001 and is already widely supported. In this post I'm going to be experimenting with the Backgrounds and Borders module and the Transitions module, mostly because the recent Firefox 3.5 release includes improved (but still experimental) support for some of the more interesting bits of it.

Crowther, Rob. Boog Design (2009). Articles>Web Design>HTML>CSS

4.
#35198

Adventures in Web 3.0: Part 3 - More CSS 3

There are some new CSS3 features supported in the latest Chrome release and Firefox alpha which make this worth a second post. This time I'm going to focus on background sizing, CSS gradients and RGBA colours.

Crowther, Rob. Boog Design (2009). Articles>Web Design>HTML>CSS

5.
#32501

Another Look at HTML 5

It has become evident to me that some of my previous comments about HTML 5 and what is going on in the HTML Working Group are the result of misunderstanding and overreacting on my part. I no longer think things are quite as bad.

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2007). Articles>Web Design>Standards>HTML5

6.
#37187

Apple Didn't Kill Flash, HTML5 Did

For most end-users, the debate over Flash is largely a debate about web video. Yes, Flash is used in other ways — for web-based games and ever-decreasingly in website design — but thanks in large part to YouTube, Flash is most commonly associated with web video. Web video is overwhelmingly encoded in H.264. Not only is the H.264 codec the default encoding setting for practically every video service online, it is also by and large the default codec for raw video from digital video cameras.

Warren, Christina. Mashable (2010). Articles>Web Design>Multimedia>HTML5

7.
#32437

The Basics of HTML

In this article you will learn the basics of HTML—what it is, what it does, its history in brief, and what the structure of an HTML document looks like.

Francis, Mark Norman. Opera (2008). Articles>Web Design>HTML>XHTML

8.
#22869

A Beginner's Guide to HTML   (PDF)

Answers to questions like: where do Web pages come from? What are all those brackets in the text, anyway? How much HTML do I have to learn? How can I get started quickly? What kinds of HTML authoring tools are available to me?

Quesenbery, Whitney. STC Proceedings (1997). Articles>Web Design>HTML

9.
#30133

A Beginner's Guide to HTML and Web Design   (PDF)

The best place to learn about HTML is on the Web itself. A few of the best resources for exploring HTML design are listed here.

Quesenbery, Whitney. STC Proceedings (1998). Articles>Web Design>Standards>HTML

10.
#38699

A Beginner's Guide to HTML, Part 1

If you don’t already understand the markup language known as HTML, there’s not necessarily a compelling reason for you to learn. However, if you’d like a better idea of how web pages work, then it’s worth taking some time to understand the underlying concepts. In today’s post, and the ones that follow in this series, I’m going to introduce the basics of how to create HTML documents.

Williams, George H. Prof Hacker (2013). Articles>Web Design>HTML

11.
#34332

Bookmark (Anchor) Linking Tip

You can link to any tag within the page by quoting its ID. For example, if you have a paragraph with an ID of "intro", then you can link directly to that point without having to insert a bookmark.

Self, Tony. HyperWrite (2007). Articles>Web Design>Information Design>HTML

12.
#37212

A Brief History of Markup

HTML is the unifying language of the World Wide Web. Using just the simple tags it contains, the human race has created an astoundingly diverse network of hyperlinked documents, from Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia, to personal blogs and websites dedicated to cats that look like Hitler. HTML5 is the latest iteration of this lingua franca. While it is the most ambitious change to our common tongue, this isn’t the first time that HTML has been updated. The language has been evolving from the start.

Keith, Jeremy. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>HTML>History

13.
#37528

Building a Custom HTML5 Video Player with CSS3 and jQuery

The HTML5 VIDEO element is already supported by most modern browsers, and even IE has support announced for version 9. There are many advantages of having video embedded natively in the browser (covered in the article Introduction to HTML5 video by Bruce Lawson), so many developers are trying to use it as soon as possible. There are a couple of barriers to this that remain, most notably the problem of which codecs are supported in each browser, with a disagreement between Opera/Firefox and IE/Safari. That might not be a problem for much longer though, with Google recently releasing the VP8 codec, and the WebM project coming into existence. Opera, Firefox, Chrome and IE9 all have support in final builds, developer builds, or at least support announced for this format, and Flash will be able to play VP8. This means that we will soon be able to create a single version of the video that will play in the VIDEO element in most browsers, and the Flash Player in those that don't support WebM natively.

Colceriu, Cristian-Ionut. Opera (2010). Articles>Web Design>Multimedia>HTML5

14.
#37582

Building Web Pages With HTML 5

Depending on who you ask, HTML 5 is either the next important step toward creating a more semantic web or a disaster that’s going to trap the web in yet another set of incomplete tags and markup soup. The problem with both sides of the argument is that very few sites are using HTML 5 in the wild, so the theoretical solutions to its perceived problems remain largely untested. That said, it isn’t hard to see both the benefits and potential hang-ups with the next generation of web markup tools.

Webmonkey (2010). Articles>Web Design>Standards>HTML5

15.
#32469

Can the alt Attribute Be Omitted Without Hurting Accessibility?

In the current editor’s draft of the HTML 5 specification, the alt attribute for images is no longer required. I am not convinced that this is a good idea.

Johansson, Roger. 456 Berea Street (2007). Articles>Web Design>Accessibility>HTML5

16.
#38809

Capturing Audio and Video in HTML5

It might not be apparent, but the rise of HTML5 has brought a surge of access to device hardware. Geolocation (GPS), the Orientation API (accelerometer), WebGL (GPU), and the Web Audio API (audio hardware) are perfect examples. These features are ridiculously powerful, exposing high level JavaScript APIs that sit on top of the system's underlying hardware capabilities. This tutorial introduces a new API, navigator.getUserMedia(), which allows web apps to access a user's camera and microphone.

Bidelman, Eric. HTML5 Rocks (2012). Articles>Web Design>Multimedia>HTML5

17.
#32465

Choosing the Right Doctype for Your HTML Documents

In this article I will look at the doctype in a lot more detail, showing what it does and how it helps you validate your HTML, how to choose a doctype for your document, and the XML declaration, which you’ll rarely need, but will sometimes come across.

Johansson, Roger. Opera (2008). Articles>Web Design>HTML>Metadata

18.
#26317

Cleaning Your Web Pages with HTML Tidy

A detailed article on using the HTML Tidy utility to clear up problems in an HTML file.

Nesbitt, Scott. InformIT (2004). Articles>Web Design>HTML>Software

19.
#34002

Common Ideas Between HTML and XHTML

As of this writing, HTML and XHTML are both being used to create Web sites. But there are multiple versions of each, with specific changes and ideas attached. The following table shows the current W3C HTML and XHTML recommendations of note.

Web Standards Project (2004). Articles>Web Design>HTML>XHTML

20.
#37517

Creating Cross Browser HTML5 Forms Now, Using modernizr, webforms2 and html5Widgets

Calendars, colour swatches, sliding widgets, client side validation: this is the nirvana that the HTML5 forms module promises. Some would say “So what? I’ve seen this on the web for years!”, and they’d be right. There have been some really brilliant people coding some really interesting widget and validation frameworks, so why should we change?

Hawryluk, Zoltan. User Agent Man (2010). Articles>Web Design>Forms>HTML5

21.
#33021

Death of a Meta Tag

The value of adding meta keywords tags to pages seems little worth the time. In my opinion, the meta keywords tag is dead, dead, dead. Like Andrew, I say good riddance!

Sullivan, Danny. ClickZ (2002). Articles>Web Design>HTML>Metadata

22.
#35201

Decoding the HTML 5 Video Codec Debate

The HTML 5 video element has the potential to liberate streaming Internet video from plugin prison, but a debate over which codec to define in the standard is threatening to derail the effort. Ars takes a close look at the HTML 5 codec controversy and examines the relative strengths and weaknesses of H.264 and Ogg Theora.

Paul, Ryan. Ars Technica (2009). Articles>Web Design>Video>HTML5

23.
#35182

Detecting HTML5 Features

You may well ask: “How can I start using HTML5 if older browsers don’t support it?” But the question itself is misleading. HTML5 is not one big thing; it is a collection of individual features. So you can’t detect “HTML5 support,” because that doesn’t make any sense. But you can detect support for individual features, like canvas, video, or geolocation.

Dive Into HTML5 (2009). Articles>Web Design>Standards>HTML5

24.
#25400

Developing Your Site for Performance, Part I: 20 Tips for Client-Side Code Optimization

This three-part article outlines a common sense, cost-effective approach to Web site acceleration according to the two simple laws of Web performance: send as little data as possible; send it as infrequently as possible.

Powell, Thomas A. and Joe Lima. uiGarden (2004). Articles>Web Design>HTML

25.
#24639

Editing Translated HTML Files   (PDF)

Follow this advice for getting rid of the clutter and strange characters in your translated HTML files.

Johnston, Becky. Intercom (2004). Articles>Web Design>HTML

 
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