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Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

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1.
#35974

Adding the Human Element in Screencasts

Screen video alone is not enough. You need to humanize your content by getting in front of the camera and engaging your audience. And no, I’m not talking about long-winded monologues either. Several 5-7 second talking-head elements can go a long way toward winning over and maintaining the interest of your audience.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2009). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

2.
#36797

Developing a Personal Voice in Audio: Avoiding a Sense of Rambling

When you write a script for a video (or when you create a general outline), you can avoid the problem of the eternal video — which I refer to as a sense of rambling — by simply keeping the video short. Don’t try to cover too much ground. You can generally speak about 100 words a minute, so keep that in mind with your script. 200 words is a good length. If you don’t believe me, when you watch videos, look at the video’s time counter and note when you start losing your attention. My patience times out at about three minutes. So I always try to keep my videos at three minutes or less.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

3.
#36154

How to Create Engagement and Add Integration

Now technical writers can focus on how to most effectively integrate screencasts into their documentation in an engaging manner. Video content seems to be very effective for grabbing and holding the attention of viewers, and you can leverage this to help guide them through the tedious details of your user documentation. Here are some tips for using screencasts more effectively.

HelpScribe (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

4.
#36119

Notes on My Latest Screencasts

I recorded the screen at 1280 x 720 pixels, because this is the minimum dimensions for creating HD quality screencasts when uploading to youtube. However, in hindsight, I would have chosen a smaller dimension and foregone the pursuit of HD. I forgot that you need an HD encoding engine to transform your videos into HD. If you record a 1280 x 720 video and upload it to youtube, youtube’s HD encoding engine will make it clear even when played at smaller dimensions. But if you’re working with the files locally and not going the HD route, you should record at the same dimensions that you plan to publish, because otherwise playing the videos at smaller dimensions leaves them a bit fuzzy.

Johnson, Tom H. I'd Rather Be Writing (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

5.
#35926

Screencasting as Art: Humanize, Structure, Pace and Production Value

Screen video alone is not enough. You need to humanize your content by getting in front of the camera and engaging your audience. And no, I’m not talking about long-winded monologues either. Several 5-7 second talking-head elements can go a long way toward winning over and maintaining the interest of your audience.

Andrus, Brooks. BrooksAndrus (2009). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

6.
#36109

Secrets of Screencasting

With a little diligence, short online videos can become powerful educational tools for IT.

Udell, Jon. InfoWorld (2005). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

7.
#36104

Seven Things You Should Know About Screencasting   (PDF)

A screencast is a screen capture of the actions on a user's computer screen, typically with accompanying audio, distributed 1through RSS. In the same way that a screenshot is a static rep- resentation of a computer screen at a point in time, a screencast captures what happens on a monitor over a period of time. The audio track can be the sound from an application being demon- strated, a narrative from the presenter, or background audio from another application. Screencasts can be produced in various formats, and users generally watch them streamed over a network.

Educause (2006). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

8.
#36226

Videos and Screencasts Have Their Drawbacks, Too

For the last year or so, I’ve heard more than a couple of people (no, Gordon, you’re not one of them) tout video and screencasts as the future of documentation. While video may have killed the radio star, I don’t think that it’s going to kill documentation as we know it. Why? Not everyone wants video as their documentation, or even as part of their documentation. They want information now, and don’t want to wait a couple of minutes to watch a walk through of what they need to do.

Nesbitt, Scott. DMN Communications (2010). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

9.
#36108

What Is a Screencast?

If you want to teach someone else how to use your new software or web service there is little that comes close to the effectiveness of a good screencast. A screencast is nothing else that a screen recording accompanied by an audio commentary done by the screencaster explaining what is happening on the screen as it happens.

Good, Robin. Master New Media (2006). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

10.
#36105

What Is Screencasting

A screencast is a digital movie in which the setting is partly or wholly a computer screen, and in which audio narration describes the on-screen action. It's not a new idea. The screencaster's tools—for video capture, editing, and production of compressed files—have long been used to market software products, and to train people in the use of those products. What's new is the emergence of a genre of documentary filmmaking that tells stories about software-based cultures like Wikipedia, del.icio.us, and content remixing. These uses of the medium, along with a new breed of lightweight software demonstrations, inspired the collaborative coining of a new term, screencast.

Udell, Jon. O'Reilly and Associates (2005). Articles>Multimedia>Video>Screencasting

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