A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Articles>Information Design>SGML

10 found.

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1.
#20114

The ABC's of SGML/HTML: Understanding the Concept of CALS and SGML   (PDF)

Many technical communicators have heard about Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS), or Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), but some do not understand the concept. This paper introduces CALS, the relationship between CALS and SGML, the structure of SGML, and how SGML affects technical communicators.

Perry, Lynn A. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Information Design>SGML

2.
#20113

Analyzing Documents to Understand Tags   (PDF)

SGML is a language for describing the structure of a document. The language involves using a system of tags for elements of a document. Document analysis is the process of discovering the elements of a document and understanding how the parts work together to form the document.

Coggin, William O. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Information Design>SGML

3.
#24188

Creating Documents with Structural Markup   (PDF)

Now we come to the point of actually producing documents using structural markup—either eXtensible Markup Language (XML) or Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). Our sequence of topics illustrates the recommended steps to follow when you first implement structural markup: Learn about it and convince yourself and your organization of its benefits, identify your specific goals and expectations, and spend plenty of time selecting or designing your document structures. Only then should you get down to the specifics of how to produce XML or SGML documents. If you simply try to drop in an XML editor to replace your current word processing application, you will be lucky to avoid total disaster.

Tyson, Paul H. Intercom (2004). Articles>Information Design>SGML>XML

4.
#19829

Document Analysis, Modelling, and Markup   (PDF)

Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) is an ISO standard for document publishing. SGML allows you to port your documentation from one plagorm to another easily. Another benefit is that SGML lets you write the information one time and use it in many places. After planning your SGML implementation, the first step in your implementation is to create a Document Type Definition( DTD). In order to create a DTD, you must complete several steps: identify project parameters, analyze your documents, model your document, convert your model to DTD mark up, and test your DTD.

Dimick, Sharlyn A. and Lori A. Stertzbach. STC Proceedings (1997). Articles>Information Design>SGML

5.
#19835

Implementing SGML: The First Steps   (PDF)

Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) is an accepted standard today. It promises to free many companies and industries from problems with document conversion, compatibility, and interoperability. Whether you’re curious about SGML’s benefits or actively planning to implement SGML, this workshop will help. As a participant, you will learn how to apply a life-cycle approach to implementing SGML. Through hands-on exercises, you will gain the knowledge to succesfully plan and implement SGML solutions.

Holman, G. Ken and Ray N. Luoma. STC Proceedings (1996). Articles>Information Design>SGML

6.
#24449

Implementing SGML: The First Steps   (PDF)

Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) is an accepted standard today. It promises to free many companies and industries from problems with document conversion, compatibility, and interoperability. Whether you’re curious about SGML’s benefits or actively planning to implement SGML, this workshop can help. As a participant, you will learn how to apply a life-cycle approach to implementing SGML. Through hands-on exercises, you will gain the knowledge to successfully plan and implement SGML solutions.

Holman, G. Ken and Ray N. Luoma. STC Proceedings (1995). Articles>Information Design>SGML>Standards

7.
#21519

An Introduction to the Principles of an SGML Application   (PDF)

SGML (ISO 8879-1986, The Standard Generalized Markup Language) is now in the mainstream of document design and development. Effective application of this International Standard demands a through understanding of Document Analysis and the four components of an SGML Application. The SGML Declaration establishes the overall syntax. The SGML Prolog uses this syntax to define a document model. An SGML Instance is a data file created in conformance with the Prolog's model and an SGML Canonical file is the output ofParsing the Instance. This paper reviews the application and interrelationship of these components.

Oster, John W. II. STC Proceedings (1994). Articles>Information Design>SGML

8.
#33795

Migrating SGML to XML: Lessons Learned

Two years ago we began the process of upgrading our content management system. Part of this upgrade required our data to be migrated from an Informix database to an Oracle database. This presented us with the opportunity to convert our data from SGML to XML. This presentation will focus on three areas: analysis/preparation for migration, migration of the data and lessons learned.

Gaschen, Robert. IDEAlliance (2004). Articles>Information Design>XML>SGML

9.
#10369

The Roots of SGML: A Personal Recollection   (peer-reviewed)   (members only)

One of the inventors of the markup language that evolved into Standard Generalized Markup Language describes the origins of SGML and provides an anecdotal history of markup language development from the late 1960s to the 1980s.

Goldfarb, Charles F. Technical Communication Online (1999). Articles>Information Design>SGML>History

10.
#24045

SGML: The Chameleon of Publishing Technology

SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) is an international standard publishing technology that's increasingly being used in government, industry, and academia. Despite this growth, SGML is perhaps the most misunderstood technology around.

Donovan, Truly. Editorial Eye, The (1996). Articles>Information Design>Standards>SGML

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