A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Agile

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Agile management promotes a project management process that encourages frequent inspection and adaptation, a leadership philosophy that encourages teamwork, self-organization and accountability, a set of best practices that allow for rapid delivery of high-quality products, and a business approach that aligns development with customer needs and company goals. It is related to extreme documentation and scrum methods.

 

51.
#27564

How to Manage Agile Development   (members only)

This whitepaper provides an Agile development overview full of techniques, best practices and educational materials.

Leffingwell, Dean. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Management>Agile

52.
#35354

The Impact of Agile on User-Centered Design   (peer-reviewed)   (members only)

Discusses the impact of an agile software development process on usability testing. Reports opinions about usability testing within a company before and after a change to agile. Presents strategies to incorporate usability testing into agile product development.

Dayton, David and Carol S. Barnum. Technical Communication Online (2009). Articles>User Centered Design>Collaboration>Agile

53.
#36776

An Insurgency of Quality   (PDF)

For the last two years I’ve focused my attention on the growth and success of agile development methods. There is nothing in the history of software quite as significant as the agile revolution. While I’m thrilled by the awesome potential of this new way of thinking, I remain aware that most revolutions in history have been co-opted and have failed to live up to their potential.

Cooper, Alan. Cooper Journal (2010). Presentations>Collaboration>Quality>Agile

54.
#38024

Integrating UX into Agile Development

How do your organizations integrate UX design and user research into agile development processes? How would you map out your entire development process, step by step?

Six, Janet M. UXmatters (2011). Articles>User Experience>Project Management>Agile

55.
#38433

Integrating UX into the Product Backlog: The User Experience Integration Matrix

Teams moving to agile often struggle to integrate agile with best practices in user-centered design (UCD) and user experience (UX) in general. Fortunately, using a UX Integration Matrix helps integrate UX and agile by including UX information and requirements right in the product backlog. While both agile and UX methods share some best practices—like iteration and defining requirements based on stories about users—agile and UX methods evolved for different purposes, supporting different values.

Innes, Jon. Boxes and Arrows (2012). Articles>User Experience>Collaboration>Agile

56.
#27568

Introduction to Agile Methods and Practices   (members only)

Provides a broad introduction to concepts of agile software development and agile methods. The talk is based on his experience as an agile coach and Certified Scrum Master.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Management>Agile>Methods

57.
#28611

Introduction to Agile Methods and Practices   (members only)

Rally's Hubert Smits provides a broad introduction to concepts of Agile software development and Agile methods. The talk is based on his experience as an Agile coach and Certified Scrum Master. Concepts that are known from waterfall or plan-driven development are transformed to an Agile perspective. Examples are release and iteration planning, progress reporting, meeting formats and scaling projects from 10 people teams to 300 people teams.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile>Scrum

58.
#28728

Introduction to Agile Usability, User Experience Activities on Agile Development Projects: Part II

What would happen when usability community meets agile community? How to adopt usability practice by agilists?

Ambler, Scott W. uiGarden (2007). Articles>Usability>Agile

59.
#27567

Introduction to Scrum Practices   (members only)

This tutorial brings Scrum to life by introducing Scrum principles, process, practices and roles in the form of an actual Sprint timebox. The prioritized, timeboxed topics are presented and delivered as arranged by the tutorial attendees.

Tabaka, Jean. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Management>Agile>Scrum

60.
#36224

Is Your Agile Software Process Handcuffing the User Experience Design?

Agile software development is a method in which software is designed, examined and delivered to the market swiftly, so that end-users can provide feedback and more feature changes can be made and adjusted within a few months time, rather than once or twice a year. But look at the Agile description again: minimal planning, small changes, releases every 1-2 months. That allows for feature by feature adjustments, not a total redesign of the workflow, layout, navigation systems, etc.

Colvin, Kris. Design for Users (2009). Articles>User Experience>Agile>Workflow

61.
#37085

The Kano Model

The Kano model is both a precious User Centered Design tool and a precious decision-making aid tool. The Kano model seeks to connect requirements (response to needs, product attributes) and customer satisfaction, and classifies 3 types of requirements, that will influence the final customer satisfaction.

Agile UX (2009). Articles>User Experience>Agile>Methods

62.
#36238

Last Sprint, First Step

This week is my last Agile sprint for a while, but I think I’ll adopt some Agile principles and apply them to my new work lifestyle as an advisor for LugIron and a contractor for Informatica here in Austin.

Gentle, Anne. Just Write Click (2010). Articles>Documentation>Technical Writing>Agile

63.
#36782

My Vision of Agile

Extreme programming showed developers that there was power in self-determination, and in reaction to all that old defensive stuff, many programmers have finally said “Enough is enough”. They emerged from their bunkers to become proactive in *guiding* the development process rather than just doing what they were told (and then getting blamed for the failure that results). And agile is the mechanism they used.

Cooper, Alan. Cooper Journal (2009). Articles>Collaboration>Agile

64.
#27560

On Be(come)ing Agile

Talks about real-world rewards and roadblocks we encounter at all levels of a business, and look at the new management and development processes we’re helping pilot, validate and roll out. For you, we hope this gives an insider’s view of the fundamental shifts taking place in software organizations that are trying to respond faster to their ever-changing understanding of user needs, evolving technologies and business demands.

On Becoming Agile. Resources>Project Management>Agile>Blogs

65.
#28602

Overview of Agile   (members only)

This presentation provides a broad introduction to concepts of Agile software development and Agile methods. The talk is based on the speaker's experience as an Agile coach and Certified Scrum Master. Traditional concepts from waterfall or plan-driven development are transformed to an Agile perspective. Examples are release and iteration planning, progress reporting, meeting formats and scaling projects from 10 people teams to 300 people teams.

Smits, Hubert. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

66.
#27562

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

This paper focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2005). Careers>Project Management>Agile>Collaboration

67.
#28598

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

When software development project teams move to Agile methodologies, they often leave project managers behind. Traditionally trained project managers are confused as to what their new roles and responsibilities should be in an environment that no longer needs them to make stand-alone decisions. This paper focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core Agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to Agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an Agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2007). Articles>Project Management>Agile

68.
#28609

A Project Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile   (members only)

When software development project teams move to Agile methodologies, they often leave project managers behind. Traditionally trained project managers are confused as to what their new roles and responsibilities should be in an environment that no longer needs them to make stand-alone decisions. This presentation focuses on re-defining the job of project manager to better fit the self-managed team environment, one of the core Agile principles. Special emphasis is placed on the shift to servant leadership, with its focus on facilitation and collaboration. Mapping of PMBOK knowledge areas to Agile practices is discussed at length. After reading this paper, project managers should have a better understanding of what changes they need to make professionally, and how to make these changes in order to survive the transition to an Agile software development approach.

Sliger, Michele. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

69.
#27253

Relating PMBOK Practices to Agile Practices

Michele Sliger understands the turmoil traditional project management practitioners go through as they make the transition from plan-driven approaches to the newer agile methodologies. This week, she offers more insight as she continues her four-part series on relating Project Management Institute (PMI) best practices--as identified in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK)--to agile practices. In this column, Michele discusses scope management and time management.

Sliger, Michele. StickyMinds (2006). Careers>Project Management>Agile

70.
#36365

Release Scrums: An Important Resource for the Agile Technical Writer

Scrums are part of the particular flavor of Agile methodology project teams use in the portfolio I work in. The managers recently borrowed the scrum concept for release preparation because the projects in this portfolio are interrelated and often have to be released together. This means that a lot of coordination is needed so that there are no surprises for anyone. Because technical writers enjoy surprises as little as anyone else, I get invited to these scrums. This lets me know how much time I have to put release notes together and whether there are any last-minute changes I need to make to them or to any other documentation.

Minson, Benjamin. Gryphon Mountain (2010). Articles>Collaboration>Agile>Scrum

71.
#36601

Scrum Agile Software Project Management Open Source Tools

Open source Scrum tools for agile project management: sprints, velocity, backlog, and user stories management.

Open Source Scrum. Resources>Software>Agile>Scrum

72.
#36599

Sharing Responsibilities in Agile Technical Writing

One challenge a technical writer faces in an agile environment is that the development team splits into a number of sub-teams, each working on a different feature or bundle of features. The sub-teams work in parallel. As a result, all the features simultaneously reach the stage where we can start documenting them, and that’s usually quite close to release date. This can cause major stress for the technical writer and can require overtime work to get everything done in time.

ffeathers (2010). Articles>Collaboration>Agile>Technical Writing

73.
#27608

Single Source Information: An Agile Practice for Effective Documentation

In agile software development you want to travel as light as possible, and the easiest way to do that is to choose the best artifact to record information. I use the term 'artifact' to refer to any model, document, source code, plan, and so on created during a software development project. Furthermore, you want to record information as few times as possible, ideally only once. For example, if you describe a business rule in a use case, then describe it in detail in a business rule specification, then implement it in code, you have three versions of the same business rule to maintain. It would be far better to record the business rule once, ideally as human-readable but implementable code, and then reference it from any other artifact as appropriate.

Ambler, Scott W. Agile Modeling (2006). Articles>Documentation>Single Sourcing>Agile

74.
#27565

Stop Super-sizing Your Release Plans   (members only)

In this presentation Ryan Martens and Luke Hohmann describe and show product owners how to think in terms of small, evenly spaced meals. They will introduce Agile principles, processes, tools and organizational structures that enable product owners to support their Agile development team's need for continuous, just-in-time elaboration of requirements and acceptance tests.

Martens, Ryan. Rally Software Development (2005). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

75.
#28608

Stop Super-Sizing Your Release Plans   (members only)

As Agile development teams gain success, the team's bottleneck moves up the food chain to product owners. To support rapid and iterative progress, development teams are demanding that product owners switch from traditional approaches of super-sizing long release cycles to a continuous flow of independent, negotiable and small, bite-sized morsels.

Martens, Ryan. Rally Software Development (2006). Presentations>Project Management>Agile

 
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