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Naranjo-Bock, Catalina

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1.
#37924

Approaches to User Research When Designing for Children

Children’s exposure to computing devices depends on a great variety of factors—including cultural traditions, economic power, and family values. But there is no doubt that, in general, children’s access to technological devices and interactive products has increased dramatically in recent years. We are now seeing even higher adoption of technology among children—thanks to the unpredictably intuitive interaction of youngsters with touchscreen technologies and mobile devices that they can carry everywhere and use at any time. As a result, it is important that we, as designers of interactive products, understand what is different in the development of digital applications that we’re targeting specifically for children. What are the implications for the UX design and user research methods we have traditionally followed?

Naranjo-Bock, Catalina. UXmatters (2011). Articles>User Experience>Methods>Children

2.
#38525

Creativity-Based Research: The Process of Co-Designing with Users

Co-design is a method that can be used in all stages of the design process, but especially in the ideation or concepting phases. Partnering with users ensures their inclusion in knowledge development, idea generation, and concept development on products whose ultimate goal is to best serve these same users.In this article I will examine the different stages of a co-design research process, as well as the methods and practices that are commonly used in each phase. Furthermore, I’ll look at the new forms of co-designing that have emerged as a result of social technologies.

Naranjo-Bock, Catalina. UX Magazine (2012). Design>User Centered Design>Collaboration

3.
#38190

Effective Use of Color and Graphics in Applications for Children, Part I: Toddlers and Preschoolers

While most of the content and interactive elements in applications for children employ graphic components and vibrant color combinations, the way in which application’s combine these elements can lead to a great user experience or be a cause of frustration and confusion. This column is a continuation of my last Designing for Children column, “Effective Use of Typography in Applications for Children.” In this column, I’ll discuss the optimal use of color and graphics when designing digital applications for kids between two and five years of age.

Naranjo-Bock, Catalina. UXmatters (2011). Design>User Centered Design>Education>Children

4.
#38361

Effective Use of Color and Graphics in Applications for Children, Part II: Kids 7 to 14 Years of Age

I dedicated my last Designing for Children column to exploring the effective use of color and graphics in interactive applications for toddlers and preschoolers. In this installment, I’ll continue my exploration of the use of color and graphics, but this time, in applications directed toward older children.

Naranjo-Bock, Catalina. UXmatters (2011). Articles>Web Design>User Experience>Children

5.
#38191

Effective Use of Typography in Applications for Children

In this installment of my column, I’ll take a look at one of the most important visual design elements for graphic user interfaces: typography. I’ll concentrate on general guidelines for the effective use of typography in the design of applications for children between 3 and 10 years of age. What considerations do we need to take into account when working with digital typography when children are its primary interpreters?

Naranjo-Bock, Catalina. UXmatters (2011). Design>Typography>Usability>Children

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