A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Morville, Peter

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1.
#21283

The Age of Findability

It doesn't replace information architecture. And it's really not a school or brand of information architecture. Findability is about recognizing that we live in a multi-dimensional world, and deciding to explore new facets that cut across traditional boundaries.

Morville, Peter. Boxes and Arrows (2002). Articles>Usability>Search

2.
#23041

Ambient Findability

For an information architect with library roots, what's next is obvious: ambient findability. I want to be able to find anything, anywhere, anytime.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (2002). Articles>Information Design>Search

3.
#26362

Ambient Findability: Findability Hacks

Findability is one of the most thorny problems in web design. This is due in part to the inherent ambiguity of semantics and structure. We label and categorize things in so many ways that retrieval is difficult at best. But that’s only the half of it. The most formidable challenges stem from its cross-functional, interdisciplinary nature. Findability defies classification. It flows across the borders between design, engineering, and marketing. Everybody is responsible, and so we run the risk that nobody is accountable.

Morville, Peter. List Apart, A (2005). Design>Web Design>User Centered Design>Search

4.
#21727

Big Architect, Little Architect

First came the primordial soup. Thousands of relatively simple single-celled web sites appeared on the scene, and each one was quickly claimed by a multi-functional organism called a "webmaster." A symbiotic relationship quickly became apparent. Webmaster fed web site. Web site got bigger and more important. So did the role of the webmaster. Life was good. Then, bad things started to happen. The size and complexity and importance of the web sites began to spiral out of control. Mutations started cropping up. Strange new organisms with names like interaction designer, usability engineer, customer experience analyst, and information architect began competing with the webmaster and each other for responsibilities and rewards. Equilibrium had been punctuated and we entered the current era of rapid speciation and specialization.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Web Design>Interaction Design>Project Management

5.
#23073

Bottoms Up: Designing Complex, Adaptive Systems

Web design is under attack. Our enemy is a dangerous meme known as reductionism. This devious adversary is spreading the notion that we can fully understand Web sites as a combination of simpler components, and that we can break the process of design into lots of quick steps and clearly defined deliverables.

Morville, Peter. New Architect (2002). Articles>Information Design>Web Design

6.
#23055

Building a Synonymous Search Index (Thesaurus)

The value of a thesaurus stems from the inherent problems of natural language indexing and searching. Different users define the same query using different terms. Document authors, indexers, and information architects describe the same concepts using different terms.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (1999). Design>Web Design>Search

7.
#23056

Calculating the Cost of a Large-Scale Web Site

A well-designed information architecture with intuitive organization, labeling, navigation, and indexing systems can significantly reduce the amount of time that users spend blundering through the hierarchies of Web sites and intranets. How much is this time-savings worth? The case is clearest for intranets where the users are your employees.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (1997). Design>Web Design>Content Management>Usability

8.
#37228

Collection: Search Patterns

A sandbox for collecting search examples, patterns, and anti-patterns.

Morville, Peter. Flickr (2010). Resources>Information Design>Search>Patterns

9.
#35551

Cos’è l’architettura dell’informazione   (PDF)

Lo sviluppo di un’architettura dell’informazione prevede parecchie sfide, ma una biblioteca è un ambiente relativamente ben definito e sono disponibili molte esperienze e sapere collettivo da cui attingere. I siti web, d’altro canto, presentano un serie di nuove sfide.

Morville, Peter and Louis Rosenfeld. Information Architecture Institute (2009). (Italian) Articles>Information Design

10.
#21736

Defining Information Architecture

What is information architecture? Is it a nascent field or a flash in the pan? What does an information architect do? Are you an information architect? Am I? Is that the right label for our discipline? Do labels and definitions matter?

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Information Design

11.
#35550

Defining Information Architecture   (PDF)

Bad buildings and bad web sites share similar architectural roots. First, many architects don’t inhabit the structures they design. They don’t fully understand the needs of their customers, and they’re not around to suffer the long-term consequences of poor decisions. Second, creating structures to stand the test of time is really difficult.

Morville, Peter and Louis Rosenfeld. Information Architecture Institute (1998). Articles>Information Design

12.
#23046

The Definition of Information Architecture

Is the widespread ignorance of information architecture our fault? Are we really such lousy communicators? What's up?

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (2004). Articles>Information Design

13.
#37089

Design Patterns: Faceted Navigation

Also called guided navigation and faceted search, the faceted navigation model leverages metadata fields and values to provide users with visible options for clarifying and refining queries. Faceted navigation is arguably the most significant search innovation of the past decade. It features an integrated, incremental search and browse experience that lets users begin with a classic keyword search and then scan a list of results.

Morville, Peter and Jeffery Callender. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Information Design

14.
#37090

Design Patterns: Faceted Navigation

Also called guided navigation and faceted search, the faceted navigation model leverages metadata fields and values to provide users with visible options for clarifying and refining queries. Faceted navigation is arguably the most significant search innovation of the past decade. It features an integrated, incremental search and browse experience that lets users begin with a classic keyword search and then scan a list of results.

Morville, Peter and Jeffery Callender. List Apart, A (2010). Articles>Web Design>Information Design

15.
#23057

Dynamic Dueling: Grappling with Java-Based Site Maps

When I compare the usability of the highly graphical MAPA dynamic site map with that of a more traditional text-based table of contents, the traditional approach wins hands-down. You can scan the contents much faster and you don't need a fast connection or a Java-enabled browser.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (1997). Design>Web Design>Information Design>Sitemaps

16.
#21733

Educating the Information Architect

The good news is that the job market for information architects is exploding. Searches on sites like Monster.com regularly turn up 200 to 300 postings for "information architects." From consulting firms like Argus and Scient to e-businesses like LookSmart to Fortune 500's like Cisco, everyone is desperately seeking information architects. The bad news is that there's no established educational degree program geared specifically to meet the needs of aspiring information architects.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Education>Information Design

17.
#23047

Enemies of Usability

I know lots of usability advocates who speak the language of business quite fluently. Could we get better? Sure. But on the whole, we are the solution, not the problem. Let's not weaken our ranks with friendly fire. We have plenty of real enemies to keep us busy.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (2002). Articles>Usability>Professionalism

18.
#18434

The Ethics of Information Architecture

Are you aware that the practice of information architecture is riddled with powerful moral dilemmas? Do you realize that decisions about labeling and granularity can save or destroy lives? Have you been designing ethical information architectures?

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Information Design>Ethics

19.
#13662

In Defense of Search

Jared Spool loves to slander search. He says 'searching stinks.' He proclaims it's 'worse than nothing.' He exhorts web designers to 'keep users from using search.' And he backs up these defamatory accusations with $3,000,000 worth of user research data. Is Jared right? Do his research results tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Is browsing better than searching? No, no, and no!

Morville, Peter. Digital Web Magazine (2002). Design>Web Design>Search

20.
#23050

In Defense of Search

Jared Spool loves to slander search. He says 'searching stinks.' He proclaims it's 'worse than nothing.' He exhorts web designers to 'keep users from using search.' And he backs up these defamatory accusations with $3,000,000 worth of user research data. Is Jared right? Do his research results tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Is browsing better than searching? No, No, and No!

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (2002). Design>Web Design>Search

21.
#21725

An Information Architect's Manifesto

Information architects of the world, unite! The environment has changed. Now, so must we!

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2001). Articles>Information Design

22.
#21732

Information Architecture and Business Strategy

Information architects need a good understanding of business strategy and its relationship to information architecture.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Information Design>Management

23.
#21735

Information Architecture and Ulcers

Being an information architect can be stressful. There are certain points in the design process that are more stress-inducing than others.

Morville, Peter. Argus Center (2000). Articles>Information Design>Project Management

24.
#23053

Information, Architecture, and Usability

What is the relationship between information architecture design and usability engineering? This is a loaded question, and I wade into dangerous waters by addressing it, but the answer has significant implications for a variety of audiences.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (1999). Articles>Information Design>Usability

25.
#23049

Innovation Architecture

As the original end-to-end architecture of the Internet is increasingly compromised, and as copyright and patent law expand their reach, the commons of code, content and creativity that launched the World Wide Web is being quietly smothered. While Lessig focuses on technology and the law, his dark prophecies are relevant to the practice of information architecture.

Morville, Peter. Semantic Studios (2002). Articles>Intellectual Property>Copyright

 
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