A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Malone, Edward A.

12 found.

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1.
#33302

A. Stanley Higgins and the History of STC's Journal   (PDF)

A profile of Stan Higgins, one of the first editors of STC's journal. Based on archival research and an interview with Higgins. Includes a table of journal titles (e.g., TWE Journal, STWE Review) and names of editors.

Malone, Edward A. IEEE PCS (2008). Articles>TC>Publishing>History

2.
#36862

Chrysler's “Most Beautiful Engineer”: Lucille J. Pieti in the Pillory of Fame   (peer-reviewed)   (members only)

The case of Lucille Pieti, a technical writer at Chrysler, serves as a discipline-specific illustration of some of Rossiter's (1995) generalizations about women scientists and engineers after World War II. Like other women with engineering degrees, Pieti emerged from college with high hopes, only to find herself consigned to one of the traditional ghettos for women scientists and engineers: technical communication. Her case is unusual, however, because she became a national celebrity.

Malone, Edward A. Technical Communication Quarterly (2010). Articles>History>TC>Gender

3.
#31201

Dolly Dahle and the Business of Technical Communication   (PDF)

Presents a biography of Dorothy ("Dolly") Dahle, a successful businesswoman in the 1950s.

Malone, Edward A. IEEE PCS (2008). Articles>History

4.
#34041

Eleanor McElwee (1924-2008)   (PDF)

Eleanor McElwee was one of the founders of the IRE Professional Group on Engineering Writing and Speech (now IEEE PCS).

Malone, Edward A. IEEE PCS (2009). Organizations>Business Communication>History

5.
#39236

Eleanor McElwee and the Formation of IEEE PCS

This article examines the historical professional project that created the Institute of Radio Engineers’ Professional Group on Engineering Writing an Speech (IRE PGEWS)—now called the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Professional Communication Society (IEEE PCS)—and recounts the group’s early history in detail. It also traces the career and recovers the professional contributions of the main organizer of PGEWS: Eleanor M. McElwee (1924–2008). The formation of PGEWS in 1957 was an intraoccupational strategy of inclusionary usurpation by “publications people” seeking to elevate their status within the engineering profession rather than attempting to build a separate profession of technical communication.

Malone, Edward A. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication (2015). Articles>History

6.
#39237

Eleanor McElwee and the Formation of IEEE PCS   (peer-reviewed)

This article examines the historical professional project that created the Institute of Radio Engineers’ Professional Group on Engineering Writing an Speech (IRE PGEWS)—now called the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Professional Communication Society (IEEE PCS)—and recounts the group’s early history in detail. It also traces the career and recovers the professional contributions of the main organizer of PGEWS: Eleanor M. McElwee (1924–2008). The formation of PGEWS in 1957 was an intraoccupational strategy of inclusionary usurpation by “publications people” seeking to elevate their status within the engineering profession rather than attempting to build a separate profession of technical communication.

Malone, Edward A. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication (2015). Articles>History

7.
#38670

The First Wave (1953-1961) of the Professionalization Movement in Technical Communication   (PDF)   (peer-reviewed)

Purpose: To demonstrate that the professionalization of our field is a long-term project that has included achievements as well as setbacks and delays Methods: Archival research and analysis. Results: Many of the professionalization issues that we are discussing and pursuing today find their genesis—or at least have antecedents—in the work of the founders of the profession in the 1950s. Conclusions: Our appraisal of our professionalization gains must be tempered by a certain amount of realism and an awareness of the history of the professionalism movement in technical communication.

Malone, Edward A. Technical Communication Online (2011). Articles>History>Professionalism

8.
#38673

A History of the Future: Prognostication in Technical Communication: An Annotated Bibliography   (peer-reviewed)   (members only)

Since the 1950s, technical communicators have been trying to predict future developments in technology, economics, pedagogy, and workplace roles. Prognosticators have included founders of the profession, academics, business leaders, and practitioners. This article examines their predictions to determine what they reveal about technical communication as a discipline.

Wright, David, Edward A. Malone, Gowri G. Saraf, Tessa B. Long, Irangi K. Egodapitiya, and Elizabeth M. Roberson. Technical Communication Quarterly (2011). Articles>Bibliographies>History

9.
#33661

John M. Kinn: IEEE-PCS' First Editor   (PDF)

Profile of John M. Kinn, a charter member of the IRE Professional Group on Engineering Writing and Speech (now IEEE-PCS) and the first editor of the Transactions on Engineering Writing and Speech (now IEEE T-PC). Includes a table of T-EWS and T-PC editors from 1958 to 2008.

Malone, Edward A. IEEE PCS (2008). Articles>History>Publishing

10.
#31200

Joseph D. Chapline: Technical Communication's Mozart   (PDF)

Presents a biography of Joseph D. Chapline, noting his role in the founding of IRE-PGEWS.

Malone, Edward A. IEEE PCS (2008). Articles>History

11.
#38672

The Role of Historical Study in Technical Communication Curricula   (PDF)   (peer-reviewed)

Historical study within academic disciplines is often used to invest students in their own futures and to create a sense of community among practitioners. As technical communication programs continue to develop, program designers must make decisions about how much historical study should be included. The current study examines information about how much value teachers of technical communication place upon historical study and the reasons for its inclusion in or exclusion from academic programs. Survey results show that attention given to historical study varies by program but that a few resources dominate study within many programs. The authors make recommendations for integrating historical study into technical communication curricula and offer an outline for a technical communication history course.

Malone, Edward A., and David Wright. Programmatic Perspectives (2012). Articles>History>Education>Academic

12.
#31086

The Use of Playing Cards to Communicate Technical and Scientific Information   (peer-reviewed)   (members only)

This article analyzes several decks of playing cards designed to communicate technical or scientific information ranging from military topics to the domestic arts to medical subjects. It places each deck in its historical context, describes the appearance and organization of the cards, and speculates about intended audience and purpose, drawing upon relevant secondary literature. It then extrapolates the conventions of this unusual genre. Finally, it argues that technical communicators can profit from this study because it raises questions and offers insights about such important topics as audience adaptation, organizational patterns, and ethical practices. Ultimately, this study may encourage reflection about these and other issues and perhaps lead to discovery and innovation.

Malone, Edward A. Technical Communication Online (2008). Articles>Scientific Communication>TC>Genre

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