A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc

27 found. Page 1 of 2.

About this Site | Advanced Search | Localization | Site Maps
 

1 2  NEXT PAGE »

 

1.
#35989

Animate to Explain - PowerPoint Motion Path and Keynote Actions

Animations are rarely used in presentations, possibly because using motion path effects on Microsoft PowerPoint or action builds on Apple Keynote is intimidating. Learn the basics of animations through an illustration of the BLK method.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Software>Podcasting>Microsoft PowerPoint

2.
#35990

The 'B' Key or Black Slide in Presentations

The B key blanks the screen during a presentation. It is advantageously replaced with a black slide for scheduled breaks to recapture audience attention. Keynote and PowerPoint techniques are presented to simulate the effect of a B key through a black slide.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Software>Podcasts>Microsoft PowerPoint

3.
#35983

Choose and Handle Presentation Remotes

Presentation remotes are both a blessing and a curse, depending on how easy they are to use and how familiar we are with them. They do free us from having to constantly stand by the keyboard, but misusing them turns off the audience. Strengths and weaknesses of four models are reviewed and advice for handling them is given.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Technology>Software>Microsoft PowerPoint

4.
#37060

An Effective Variant on the Assertion – Evidence Paradigm

Does Assertion follow Evidence, or Evidence follow Assertion as in the traditional scientific order? Some do not care about the order. But some prefer to see the evidence before an assertion is made – particularly if a question is raised prior to showing the enlightening visual evidence. When asked to probe this visual evidence for answers, their mind leaves the passive show-me mode to enter the active let-me-see mode. They are more involved and interested. When they discover the yet-to-appear assertion by themselves, under the friendly guidance of the presenter, they are more likely to be convinced by it and more likely to remember it when it is revealed. Two visuals illustrate the two cases.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scientific Presentations (2010). Presentations>Scientific Communication>Instructional Design>Microsoft PowerPoint

5.
#37424

From Presenter Ghost to Presenter Host

The classic ghostly figure of a presenter plunged in semi-darkness casting shadows created by the light of a giant projected image is one presenters dread. To avoid this situation, presenters are not defenseless. This blog entry provides 10 ways to regain the upper hand over your thunder stealing co-host, the computer.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Academic>Scientific Communication>Presentations>Advice

6.
#36654

Is “Less is More” a Presentation Law as Universal as the Law of Gravity?

This blog entry explores the limits of the "less is more" presentation maxim when applied to scientific presentations. Can the contents of slides be reduced to a few words to reduce their electronic carbon footprint? The less-is-more advice found in popular presentation skills books, if followed to the letter, would leave an audience of scientists gasping for more data to gain sufficient understanding to be able to appreciate the scientific contribution. The author identifies lower boundaries below which "less is less", and also considers the cases where "more is more." Our short active working memory sets boundaries to that maxim.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Minimalism

7.
#37423

Keep What the Audience Sees in Sync with Your Speech

Audience divided attention is the greatest danger facing presenters. This blog entry provides visual examples on how to avoid such disconnects while using Microsoft PowerPoint of Apple Keynote.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Academic>Scientific Communication>Presentations>Information Design

8.
#35988

Map Slide and Navigation Hyperlinks in PowerPoint/Keynote

In large presentations, a graphical map slide and invisible hyperlinks help the audience keep track of progress while letting the presenters follow either a preset or a spontaneous path through their slides. Map slide and hyperlinks allow presenters to keep to time and to respond immediately to perceived audience needs.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Software>Hypertext>Microsoft PowerPoint

9.
#35981

Microphones and How to Handle Them

Learn how to identify the type of mike you are given for your talk, and learn how to handle it to avoid volume changes and popping. Audibility is as important as slide legibility. Audibility is affected by microphone pick-up patterns, and microphone handling.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Multimedia>Audio>Voice

10.
#37057

Nothing Reveals Personal Expertise Better than Questions; Therefore…

Slides never proved expertise. Confidence never proved expertise. Correct answers to unprepared questions prove personal expertise.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scientific Presentations (2010). Presentations>Scientific Communication>Advice

11.
#35985

Pan Through Images with Apple Keynote

With this technique the presenter moves seamlessly inside a document larger than a slide by imitating a camera panning through a document, as if the hand moved a transparency across an overhead projector (Keynote pixel-based offset).

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Graphic Design>Software>Apple Keynote

12.
#35984

Pan Through Images with PowerPoint

With this technique the presenter moves seamlessly inside a document larger than a slide by imitating a camera panning through the document, as if the hand moved a transparency across an overhead projector (PowerPoint inch-based offset)

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Graphic Design>Software>Microsoft PowerPoint

13.
#36655

Presentation Traps 1: Hazardous Comparisons

In your presentation, usually at the beginning in the motivation part, a slide appears, and on that slide you compare your method to previous state of the art methods, or methods widely accepted and recognised as adequate by practitioners in the field. Of course, you carefully chose the topics of comparison to ensure your work appears superior... This is a trap. The author explains why.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Rhetoric

14.
#37202

Presentation Traps 10: The Room Trap

Because the environment of a presentation, in this case the meeting room, is frequently the cause of many glitches, the author proposes guidelines to avoid such glitches.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Presentations>Scientific Communication>Communication>Planning

15.
#36656

Presentation Traps 2: Forced Audience Interaction

“Probe the audience”, “Interact with the audience”, the pundits say. And out on a limb they go, the misfortunate presenters for whom good advice but poor timing garner nothing but the deathly silence of an unsympathetic audience. Do not rush the audience into action. An audience that has had time to be interested in both the presenter and his topic is easier to engage. By the time the talk ends, the audience is ready to interact through the Q&A: the time is right, and the audience is ready.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Rhetoric

16.
#36657

Presentation Traps 3: The Joke Is On You

Start with a joke”, “deride the audience”, “make them like you by making them laugh”, the pundits say. And out they go, on a limb as always, the serious presenters whose sense of humour is such that they usually end up being the only ones who laugh at the end of their own jokes. Avoid jokes altogether at the start of your talk, even cartoons that may be funny. A play on word requires a good understanding of English. Idiomatic expressions, or culture specific funny jokes are beyond the level of comprehension of scientists with English as a second language or from different cultural backgrounds. If you want the audience to relax, use the only way that works 100% of the time: Face the audience, and SMILE.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>International

17.
#36658

Presentation Traps 4: The Mouth Trap

Ice water, coffee, milk, spaghettis... all represent food dangers that are likely to affect the performance of a presenter.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Advice>Scientific Communication

18.
#36660

Presentation Traps 6: The Conclusion Traps

You are in danger of falling into one of three conclusion traps. 1. Your conclusion slide is a summary of your results. 2. You know you are close to the end of your talk, everything has been said, and you rush through that slide, simply reading its bullets. 3. You do a great job with your conclusion slide, and after clicking one last time the next slide button on your presentation remote, you land into one of the following slides: a) the black screen indicating the end of your presentation (a PowerPoint feature); b) the traditional Acknowledgment slide; or c) a black slide on which the words “Thank You” are written in Font size 88 – for good luck The author explains why.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Rhetoric

19.
#36661

Presentation Traps 7: The Cultural Trap

The author recommends not to use metaphors or expressions that are meaningless to a foreign audience and not to display extensive culture by using a sophisticated word where a simpler one exists.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When the Scientist Presents (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Minimalism

20.
#37200

Presentation Traps 8: The Knowledge Trap

“And here, you see…. But the lack of knowledge leaves us blind – a temporary type of blindness, assuredly, but blindness nevertheless. For knowledge only lights up the world of the expert.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Presentations>Scientific Communication>Accessibility

21.
#37201

Presentation Traps 9: The Rehearsal Traps

The author presents five common rehearsal scenarios which all look fine, but each one contains a fatal flaw. Through these brief case studies, the reader is introduced to the correct way to rehearse a presentation

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Presentations>Scientific Communication>Communication>Planning

22.
#35986

Produce Effects Without Effects

As the number of effects increases, custom animations rapidly become unwieldy. An alternative technique consists in using one slide per effect, thus simplifying the process. The addition of slide transitions ensures that entrance or exit effects are maintained. The drawbacks of creating effects without effects - a large number of slides- are compensated by two key advantages: simplicity, and direct access to any part of a slide composed of many effects, not just its beginning.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Document Design>Software>Microsoft PowerPoint

23.
#37059

Rules of Thumb for Presentations: How Good Are They?

Two rules of thumb are examined and critiqued. Rule of thumb #1: “Plan for one and a half minute per slide.” Rule of thumb #2: “Use not more than 5 lines and 5 words per line.” These are shown to be inadequate in many situations.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scientific Presentations (2010). Articles>Presentations>Scientific Communication>Microsoft PowerPoint

24.
#35987

Scaling Objects and Groups Containing Text

To resize a group of object that includes text, first the group has to be converted into an image or text needs to be resized separately from the image. It is possible to reduce the effect of vertical or horizontal resizing on legibility by choosing an appropriate font type.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. Scivee (2009). Presentations>Software>Graphic Design>Microsoft PowerPoint

25.
#37425

SMILE

Under the simple SMILE title, the author of the blog reveals universal truths that presenters would do well to put into practice. The gorgeous picture used to make the point should bring a smile to your face.

Lebrun, Jean-Luc. When The Scientist Presents (2010). Academic>Presentations>Advice

 
 NEXT PAGE »

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookRSSPost about us on: TwitterFacebookDeliciousRSSStumbleUpon