A directory of resources inthe field of technical communication.

Horton, William K. III

12 found.

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1.
#24787

Converting Documentation to Multimedia   (PDF)

Multimedia has proven its ability to sell products and educate users. But can it also perform tasks traditionally done with conventional paper documents? Yes. This demonstration shows how several hardware and software documents were converted to multimedia and provides a plan for converting your documents. You learn whether to display, speak, or just eliminate existing text. You see how to replace action words, descriptions of motion, and arrows with animation. YOU see how sound can guide rather than distract the user. You also learn to use interactivity to give control to the user. Along the way you see the compromises needed to keep the project on schedule, within budget, and down to size.

Horton, Katherine W. and William K. Horton III. STC Proceedings (1995). Articles>Documentation>Multimedia

2.
#20292

Design Once: Use Again and Again and Again…   (PDF)

You can either do it over and over again; or, you can design it once and use it again and again. The decision to create reusable learning modules need not be an expensive one. It just requires modular design.

Horton, William K. III. STC Proceedings (1998). Articles>Education>Instructional Design>Online

3.
#25017

Low-Cost Multimedia: Multimedia You Can Use   (PDF)

You do not need multimedia. Unless you have to explain complex, abstract concepts to busy people. Unless you have to convince skeptical, sometimes hostile, readers. Unless you have to communicate to those who cannot see or hear. Or cannot read your language perfectly. Or who refuse to read. But multimedia is an easy way to waste a lot of money in a hurry. This workshop is not about how to waste money. It is about how multimedia lets skillful communicators communicate better. The secret? Guts not glitz.

Horton, William K. III. STC Proceedings (1994). Articles>Multimedia

4.
#20074

No Dumping Allowed: The Right Way to Put Documents Online   (PDF)

The best way to fail at online documentation is to dump existing paper documents online. Successful online documentation requires thoughtful design that takes account of the many subtle differences between paper and online documents. This demonstration shows why dumping documents online is a bad idea, what you should do instead, how to convince your management not to dump documents online, and what to do if they require you to dump documents online.

Horton, Katherine W. and William K. Horton III. STC Proceedings (1995). Articles>Documentation>Online

5.
#20127

Say It in Multimedia: Crash Course in New-Media Literacy   (PDF)

Come to our demonstration to learn how to combine media to better communicate complex concepts. We’ll show step-by-step procedures, tutorials, and games—all using multimedia to communicate hard business and technical information.

Horton, William K. III and Katherine W. Horton. STC Proceedings (1996). Design>Multimedia>TC

6.
#20126

Say It in Pictures: Crash Course in Visual Literacy   (PDF)

Today, communication requires more than just pages of printed words. Producing effective documents and training requires the ability to understand, think and communicate graphically. This demonstration shows how to communicate almost anything graphically. Through creative brainstorming you will start to think visually and learn valuable principles that you can use back on the job to refine your own graphics.

Horton, William K. III and Katherine W. Horton. STC Proceedings (1996). Design>Graphic Design>Rhetoric>Visual Rhetoric

7.
#27648

Stairway to Expertise

Tools like Captivate, Camtasia, and TurboDemo make it possible for teachers and communicators to create effective software simulations--without programming. Even simple presentation tools, such as PowerPoint can create truly interactive simulations.

Horton, William K. III. WritersUA (2005). Articles>Multimedia>Interaction Design

8.
#22266

Test and Exercise Learning: Tests, Quizzes, and Self-Evaluations

Feared by learners, discounted by educational pundits, short-changed by instructional designers, tests are, nevertheless, an essential element of learning. We may call them quizzes, drills, examinations, assessments, competence monitors, or demonstrations of mastery. We may cloak them as games or puzzles. Yet, they remain an essential ingredient for gauging a learner’s progress. Tests, along with other kinds of activities, give learners an opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and attitudes they have learned. Well designed tests provide a reliable way to measure progress objectively.

Horton, William K. III. William Horton Consulting (2000). Articles>Education>Instructional Design>Testing

9.
#19741

Tools for Authoring Knowledge Products

Authoring tools are used to create and integrate the components of knowledge products. They include tools used by designers, writers, editors, artists, animators, photographers, videographers, and others involved in producing knowledge products.

Horton, William K. III and Katherine W. Horton. Indus (2002). Articles>Knowledge Management>Software

10.
#26204

Top Ten Blunders   (PDF)

Common goofs, mistakes, bloopers, mal mots, slip ups, lapses, oversights, gaffes, and 'foe paws' in online documentation and Help.

Horton, William K. III. STC Orange County (1998). Presentations>Documentation>Help

11.
#24290

Top Ten Blunders in Online Documents and Help Facilities   (PDF)

As a consultant I get called in after the wreck to figure out what went wrong. Across a wide range of industries and products, the same problems recur again and again. In this presentation, I’ll show you what these common problems are and simple ways to avoid them.

Horton, William K. III. STC Proceedings (1998). Articles>Documentation>Online>Help

12.
#22912

Visual Literacy Crash Course   (PDF)

Today, communication requires more than just pages of printed words. Producing effective documents and training requires the ability to understand, think, and communicate graphically-to be visually literate. This demonstration shows how to communicate almost anything graphically. Through creative brainstorming you will start to think visually and to translate text into graphics. By looking at numerous examples of what works and what doesn’t, you are going to learn valuable principles that you can use back on the job to refine your own graphics.

Horton, William K. III. STC Proceedings (1997). Design>Graphic Design>Visual Rhetoric

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