Added by Geoff Sauer on Feb 14, 2010.
Average rating: 4.50/5.00 (n=2, std dev: 0.71)
 


Within the last 12 years, email has emerged as the most commonly used form of written communication in the corporate workplace. A 1997 study, conducted by Office Team, revealed that a majority of American executives favored face-to-face meetings to any other form of communication; only 34% preferred email (Oh, 2007). By contrast, a 2005 survey sponsored by the Economist Intelligence Unit indicated that two thirds of corporate executives prefer email as a means of business communication compared to the next most popular options—desktop telephones and mobile phones. These are each favored by just 16% of those participating in the study (Economist Intelligence Unit, 2005). More recently, a 2008 study performed by the Pew Internet & American Life Project revealed that 72% of all full-time employees have an email account that they use for work, and 37% of those workers “check them constantly” (Madden & Jones, 2008). Several factors have contributed to the widespread use of email. This form of communication is generally rapid, is more economical than distributing or mailing printed documents, and permits simultaneous communication with large numbers of recipients.
 
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